Showing posts with label Terrier. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Terrier. Show all posts

Friday, September 14, 2018

NORFOLK TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Norfolk Terrier - Dogs of the World



Thursday, September 13, 2018

Why Own a NORFOLK TERRIER Dog as Pet

Norfolk Terrier
Norfolk Terrier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you are planning to get a Norfolk terrier pet dog, here are some things you should know:

The Norfolk terrier originated from England. It is actually very affectionate and does not exhibit a disagreeable nature. Because of this, many people like to keep them as pets. However, there can be quite some difficulty housetraining a Norfolk terrier pet dog. This is because of the fact that a Norfolk terrier pet dog can be quite stubborn. The best method recommended for this breed is crate training.

What is crate training? Well, it involves training your Norfolk terrier pet dog to stay in a crate when it is left unsupervised. Used humanely, a crate can be a great den for your Norfolk terrier pet dog. This will help your Norfolk terrier pet dog when it needs some sort of privacy or alone time. This will also train your Norfolk terrier pet dog not to soil around the house. One advantage of crate training is the fact that you can be reassured that your pet will be safe even if it is left unsupervised. Travelling will also be much more comfortable since your Norfolk terrier pet dog will have adjusted to his den.

A Norfolk terrier pet dog does not naturally shed its fur. This fact has a good side and a bad side. On the good side, no shedding means no mess. This means that they can be kept indoors without risk of leaving fur on your floor. However, you do need to take your Norfolk terrier pet dog to a groomer twice a year in order to strip the coat. This is done in order to promote the growth of a new weather-resistant coat. In a sense, this allows your Norfolk terrier pet dog to freshen up.

In order to properly care for the coat of your Norfolk terrier pet dog, you need to brush it at least twice a day. This will help get rid of tangles and prevent matting.

Ideally, a Norfolk terrier pet dog should be kept in a place with a fenced yard so that it can have a large space to romp around. This is because of the fact that Norfolk terrier pet dogs thrive on activity. Boredom for this breed usually leads to destruction so you should try to keep it occupied.

The best quality that a Norfolk terrier pet dog exhibits are the ability to get along with other pets. They also love children. This means that kids will have a lot of fun with a Norfolk terrier pet dog. You should be careful, however, as Norfolk terrier pet dogs may perceive smaller animals as prey.


One thing that may be admired in a Norfolk terrier pet dog is the fact that though it is not aggressive, it is generally a courageous breed. Because of this, a Norfolk terrier pet dog can make an excellent watchdog. Another factor that contributes to this is the fact that a Norfolk terrier pet dog is usually very alert and will bark immediately to alert the family.

Before you get a Norfolk terrier pet dog, you need to make sure that you gather as much information as possible. By understanding the different aspects of the Norfolk terrier pet dog, you will make sure that you have the ability to care for one.



Monday, September 3, 2018

Major Concerns with a BORDER TERRIER

Border Terrier - Photo: Pixabay
If you want to have a small but sturdy pet dog, then the Border terrier might be for you. This pet is no delicate lapdog. The Border terrier pet dog is full of fun for the whole family.

Before getting a Border terrier pet dog, however, you might want to consider some of the major concerns regarding the breed. This will help you weigh the pros against the cons and will let you reach a decision that would be best for you. 

Here are some concerns regarding Border terrier pet dogs:

1) Temperament – when people talk about terriers, they all comment on the same behavior using different words. Some people say that their dogs are feisty. Some say that their dogs are stubborn. Some people would prefer to use the word impulsive. The point is, they all describe the same behavior. A terrier is inherently dynamic in its behavior. It is part of what makes a terrier, a terrier.

The temperament of the Border terrier pet dog may be quite surprising, if not outright shocking for most people because of its size. For such a small dog, a Border terrier pet dog sure packs a lot of energy.

2) Aggression - Border terrier pet dogs are not really as aggressive as other breeds. However, its instincts as a terrier would still urge it to run after anything smaller than it. This means that if you own a cat or even a pet rabbit, you cannot have a Border terrier pet dog. This also means that you cannot trust a Border terrier pet dog out of its leash. If it even sees something running, it will take off, leaving you yelling uselessly. This, of course, can cause accidents to happen. In order to make sure that your Border terrier pet dog does not get hit by a car, you need to keep that pet on a leash outside.

3) Escape – it is recommended by many experts that Border terrier pet dogs should be kept in a fenced-in yard to let it have some roaming space while making sure that it is safe. However, you should know that Border terrier pet dogs are clever escape artists. Even if a Border terrier pet dog is within a closed in a fence, you should try to keep an eye on it.

4) The noise - Border terrier pet dogs will bark at practically anything that catches their attention. Because of this, you need to properly train them to bark only when needed. You should also be quick to stop them if they are barking inappropriately.



For this reason, you should not really get a Border terrier pet dog if you live with very close neighbors and if you work during the day. An unsupervised Border terrier pet dog is sure to keep barking all day long. This, of course, may draw complaints from your neighbors.

5) Independent thinking – what people love about Border terrier pet dogs is the fact that they can learn very quickly. This is because of their inherent curiosity and toughness. However, the same qualities that make them prize-winners can also make them very stubborn when they want to. You have to be consistent with your commands and show the Border terrier pet dog that you mean what you say. In doing so, you will be training the Border terrier pet dog properly.


Thursday, August 2, 2018

Some Information Regarding CAIRN TERRIER Pet Dogs

Cairn-Terrier
Cairn-Terrier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
If you are thinking of getting a Cairn terrier pet dog, then you need to know some information about it first. Why? Well, knowing the right information about anything will help you in the long run. This is especially true when we are talking about a pet owner. Before you get a Cairn terrier pet dog, you need to be sure that you know what you are getting yourself into. You need to know how to take proper care of your cairn terrier pet dog and you also need to know what to expect when you are getting one.

Thankfully, there are a lot of sites on the internet which can provide you the necessary information. To save you some time, however, here are the basics:

Originally bred in the Scottish highlands, the Cairn terrier is the smallest of all terrier breeds. You should not let the size deceive you when you are getting a Cairn terrier pet dog, however. The Cairn terrier was first bred because of its working ability. You know what this means? This means energy.

A Cairn terrier pet dog has a lot of energy to spare. They can gain a lot from taking brisk walks daily. However, you should know that they do best when they have a fenced-in yard to play in. This way, they get more room when they play. Their high energy also means that they aren’t really suitable for apartment or condo living. If you live in such places, then having a Cairn terrier pet dog is not for you.

Their energy may also put them in danger. This is the reason why you need to make sure that a Cairn terrier pet dog stays in one area. Their natural instincts tell them to dig and run and these activities may lead to accidents if unsupervised.

There are, however, a lot of positive things that can be said about a Cairn terrier pet dog’s energy. For one thing, it makes the dog fun to play with. It can play for hours on end, giving you the companionship that you want. Another positive with this energy is the fact that this energy can be channeled into good purposes. A Cairn terrier pet dog is naturally inquisitive and is always willing to participate in a new adventure. This means that a Cairn terrier pet dog can be easily taught to do tricks. They learn tricks very fast and thrive in obedience training.

You need to make sure that your Cairn terrier pet dog is trained properly since untrained ones have a tendency to be destructive when they are bored.


Let us talk about the proper care for a Cairn terrier pet dog. One thing you do not need to worry about is its coat. The Cairn terrier pet dog was not bred for the beauty of its coat. The coat of a Cairn terrier pet dog is weather resistant and sheds little to no fur. Because of this, it can be a great indoor pet.

Being the smallest of terrier breeds, however, makes Cairn terrier pet dogs especially vulnerable to various health problems. Care must be taken when feeding it as it can gain weight quite rapidly. A Cairn terrier pet dog is also especially sensitive to fleas. However, you can be sure that this is one of the best breeds around.


Wednesday, August 1, 2018

CAIRN TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Cairn Terrier - Dogs of the World



Monday, June 18, 2018

DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Dandie Dinmont Terrier - Dogs of the World



Saturday, June 16, 2018

DANDIE DINMONT TERRIERS: Ten Things You May Not Know About Them

English: The female - Dandie Dinmont Terrier d...
The female - Dandie Dinmont Terrier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Although controversy has always surrounded the biological origins of the dog now known as the Dandie Dinmont, no one has ever queried the background to his strange name.  It was from noble beginnings, in Sir Walter Scott’s 'Guy Mannering', that the name Dandie Dinmont first came to life.  Here are ten more things you may not know about the Dandie Dinmont …..

*  James Davidson, a farmer from the Rule Water in the Scottish Borders, is believed to have inspired the character ‘Dandie Dinmont’ in Sir. Walter Scott’s book.

*  In the early 1900s the little terriers that eventually became known as Dandie Dinmonts were more commonly called Pepper or Mustard Terriers or by the name of the farm where they were bred, e.g. Hindlee Terrier.  Hindlee was the home of  James Davidson who himself kept six Dandies, called: ‘Auld Pepper’, ‘Auld Mustard’, ‘Young Pepper’, ‘Young Mustard’, ‘Little Pepper’ and ‘Little Mustard’.  Davidson was adamant that all Dandies descended from two of his own dogs named Tarr and Pepper.

*  Sir Walter Scott also kept Dandie Dinmonts at Abbotsford alongside other popular breeds of the day.

*  The Dandie may have been closely related to the Bedlington Terrier, both having the same pendulous ear, and a light top-knot.  But the Dandie evolved into a long-bodied, short-legged dog and the Bedlington grew into a long-legged dog with a short body.  To illustrate the close relationship of the two breeds records show that Lord Antrim, in the early days of dog shows, exhibited two animals from the same litter, and with one obtained a prize or honorable mention in the Dandie classes, and with the other a like distinction in the Bedlington classes.

*  At one time the Dandie was included in the general family of Scotch (Scottish) Terriers and was recognized as a separate breed in 1873.  The Kennel Club of the UK was also formed in 1873 and just two years later, on 17th November 1875, a meeting was held at The Fleece Hotel, Selkirk, at which was formed The Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club.  

*  The breed standard of early Dandie enthusiasts was laid down by William Wardlaw Reed and other enthusiasts of the day.  The meeting that established the standards which are very much similar to those used today was held at the Red Lion Hotel in Carlisle, England, in 1876.  Apart from one minor amendment in 1921, when the weight range was changed from 14  - 24 lbs to 18 - 24 lbs, the Dandie standard in Great Britain remained unchanged for more than one hundred years. 

*   In the 1980s the Kennel Club of England asked breed Clubs to change the old judging standard to a new set and the original wording of the standard set in 1876 was amended.  Now all countries use the standard as revised in 1987 except Canada which adhered to the original standard.  


*  The breed has been popular with gypsies and the aristocracy, thereby revealing this as a dog that really can mix in all social circles and, in the late 19th Century, devoted breeders Bradshaw-Smith of Blackwood house and Gerald Leatham of Weatherby, presented a Dandie Dinmont to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

*  In his book 'D is for Dog' (various publishers), veterinary surgeon Frank Manolson described the Dandie as one "who looks and acts like a grizzled backwoodsman shopping in Tiffany’s.  If you want a real individualist, you simply must consider the Dandie Dinmont."

*  The Dandie looks wise and thoughtful and according to an old Scottish saying: ‘A Dandie looks at you as though he’s forgotten more than you will ever know




Friday, June 15, 2018

BEDLINGTON TERRIER - A Playful Companion

English: Bedlington terrier 234
Bedlington terrier  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The Bedlington Terrier is a small to medium sized dog that weighs between 18-23 pounds. Their height generally ranges between 15" to 17". This breed resembles a little lamb, but don't let their gentle appearance fool you. They are all terrier with energy and a mischievous side that likes to chase small animals.

The AKC recognized coat colors for the Bedlington Terrier are sandy, blue, liver, sandy and tan, blue and tan, liver and tan. The coat is a mixture of soft and hard hair that tends to be curly but not wiry. This breed requires regular groom and also requires trimming about every 6 weeks. Most Bedlington Terrier owners learn to clip their own dogs. 

This intelligent, loving and gentle breed makes a good family pet. They are good with children. However, because they have such a high energy level they are recommended for homes with older, well-behaved children. With early socialization, they can be good with other dogs and pets. They were bred to hunt vermin and small animals, so they might still chase cats and other non-canine pets. A well-secured yard and a leash are a must as they are very quick dogs and are hard to catch if they run from you or are chasing an animal. 

They need plenty of play and exercise, but are somewhat active indoors, so a small yard or regular walks will suffice. They are easy to train. They love to be around their family and don't like to be left alone for long periods of time. Even though they are a smaller breed, they will protect their family or fend for themselves against large animals if need be. They tend to be wary of strangers, but will eventually warm up to them. 


Originating in England, the Bedlington Terrier was originally known as the Rothbury, Rodbury or Northumberland fox terrier. The first Bedlington Terrier was born in 1825 when a Rothbury dog was bred with a female Bedlington. The Bedlington terrier was originally bred to hunt small vermin such as rabbits and badgers. They are mainly used as companion dogs today.

A breed with such a playful, loving, energetic nature is perfect for families that will give them enough exercise and companionship. A good watchdog and a friendly family pet all rolled into one make the Bedlington Terrier fit into many family dynamics.


Sunday, April 22, 2018

AUSTRALIAN TERRIER - Puppies of the World

Australien Terrier - Puppies of the World



Thursday, April 19, 2018

AUSTRALIAN TERRIERS Make Loyal Pets


The Australian Terrier is one of the smallest of the terrier dog group. It was originally bred in Australia around 1885 as a working dog to guard mines and to tend sheep. The Australian Terrier is a healthy and hardy breed. They are long-living to 15 years or more and free of any major hereditary defects.

They have a rough-textured straight coat 2in. to 3in. long with colorings ranging from silver- or blue-black through to tan with a distinctive soft-haired topknot on their head.

The Australian Terrier is tough and cheeky and stands 9in to 11in high. However, like many other terrier breeds, in its own mind, it is a much larger dog and is quite fearless. It is energetic and loyal and will display great affection to its family. It is confident and curious, has keen hearing and eyesight and therefore makes a useful watchdog. Because it likes to please its master is can be more easily trained than some other terriers.

Unlike many other terrier breeds, the Australian Terrier does not usually display aggression towards other dogs although they may chase small animals outside the home. They can occasionally display wariness towards strangers although they are not excessively suspicious. They travel well and can be somewhat easier to train than other terrier types although their training needs to be strict; their self-assured nature can make them want to follow their own ideas rather than yours!

Australian terriers make good apartment dogs. They are adaptable and will remain active indoors but will require outdoor exercise and, like all terriers, need to be walked on a leash due to their tendency to chase other animals.





The Australian Terrier sheds little or no hair and will not require clipping except perhaps around the eyes and ears when blunt-nosed scissors should be used. Regular brushing is recommended. This will stimulate natural oil secretion from the skin which will help to develop a high gloss to the coat. Clip the toenails regularly. Australian Terriers do not require washing more than once a month. More frequent washing will tend to make their tough coat go lank.

Your Australian Terrier will consider himself to be a part of your family and will be a loyal and loving companion.




Sunday, April 8, 2018

Fact Sheet: DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

(Original Title: Dandie Dinmont Terrier - Facts You Must Know Before Adopting
Dandie Dinmont Terrier)

Dandie Dinmont Terrier - GCH King's Mtn. Angelina Ballerina 02
Photo by Petful.com
Breed Description

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small breed with a distinctive top-knot hair on the head of this terrier dog. Primarily bred to go to the ground, this breed is a low-stationed working dog with an arched top line. They are between 8-11 inches tall at the shoulders and weighs from 18-24 pounds at the average.

Coat

The Dandie Dinmont has a coat mixed with rough top coat and silky undercoat, as demonstrated over their heads. The distinctive hairs on their heads are usually kept relatively long and may shroud the eyes if left without trimming for too long. Their coat color comes in silver and black coat, or reddish-yellow color that is commonly called "mustard".

Activity

These dogs need to be walked on a daily basis and will enjoy playing in the park, or any other securely fenced open areas.

Temperament

The breed is fun-loving and affectionate, making them an excellent companion dog. They are determined, lively, and willful, with intelligent and independent nature, bold, yet dignified. They are aloof with strangers, often protective of family and property. They are great with well-behaved kids, and babies, as long as they were reared with them. Dominance varies greatly, as some males may be aggressive with male dogs in their home, while females can be bad-tempered and snappy.

Overview

Also known as the Dandie or the Hindlee Terrier, this is a breed of dog that belongs to the Terrier group. This interesting little breed has a body similar to that of a Dachshund, but they have a wavy and long coat, with puffed white hair on top of their heads.

Care

These dogs require regular brushing. They need professional grooming, as dead hair should be plucked at about once or twice in a year.

Training

These dogs are tricky to train. They require firm, consistent, and fun training sessions to make these puppies interested. They are intelligent but intelligent enough to question the judgment of their trainers. It is therefore imperative to use positive reinforcement as your approach to asserting your stand as the leader of the pack.

Housebreaking is an important part of training for new owners of these puppies. The key is to be around all the time while they are small, and never allowing them access to the areas where they can muddle up around the house.



Crate training is known to be effective for your dog's training as this allows them the opportunity for quiet time in a space where he can make it his territory, as well as a chance for early housetraining owners can work on.

Character

These dogs are generally lively, independent, and affectionate. They are friendly but can be stubborn at times. They are bold, unafraid, but remains dignified, even when playing. They are extremely loyal and can make excellent guard dogs. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is intelligent, playful, and fun especially when given enough attention.




Wednesday, April 4, 2018

AIREDALE TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Airedale Terrier - Dogs of the World



Wednesday, March 21, 2018

All About WHEATEN TERRIERS

A 3½ year old Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier name...
A 3½-year-old Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier named Clio.
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Few things give us as much pleasure as owning a dog. Dogs make wonderful companions and it is no wonder they have become known as "man's best friend". A dog will always greet you with joy and happiness, unlike people who can be grumpy or unpleasant at times. Dog owners always speak about their pet's "unconditional love" and this is a fact because a dog will always be devoted to his owner, even if that owner is not the most pleasant of people!

Dogs have become so popular as pets that many people don't realize the time and energy it can take to properly take care of them, and some people buy a dog at the spur of a moment without giving much thought to whether they can care for him or not. This results in thousands of dog being abandoned. If you're considering buying or adopting a dog you should know that not all dogs are the same, some breeds are more high maintenance than others and you should choose a breed that suits your lifestyle. Wheaten terriers are high maintenance dogs for a few reasons that we shall go into in this article.
Wheaten terriers are a breed of dog that originated in Ireland. They were originally bred as an all-purpose farm dog whose duties varied from watching, guarding and herding livestock to hunting vermin. While most terriers can sometimes be aggressive, this is not so with the Wheaten terrier. They are mellower than other terriers.

Wheaten terriers are famous for their coat which is very soft and comprises of hair, not fur. The Wheaten Terrier is a popular dog with allergic dog owners due to the fact that they have a single coat of hair and shed very little making them relatively hypoallergenic. There are four coat types: American, English, Heavy Irish and Traditional Irish.

Wheaten Terriers are medium sized dogs that don't shed; their hair keeps growing and so requires regular grooming and trimming, making them a high maintenance dog to keep. Whether or not you keep your dog indoors or out, he will need to be brushed regularly if you are to avoid his coat from becoming matted or tangled. These dogs also require more frequent bathing than most other dogs because of their soft coat.
Like all terriers, the Wheaten Terrier is an active, playful breed that needs exercise if it is to thrive. They respond well to positive training and harsh or aggressive treatment may result in a dog that fears bites. They are highly intelligent dogs that require a substantial amount of attention. If you don't have the time to give to your dog, this may not be the breed for you.



Wheaten terriers make great family pets, often being very good with children and other pets. Early training ensures your dog is well adjusted to a home environment and they can be very protective of their human pack" without being overly aggressive.

Wheaten terriers are generally a hardy breed though they are prone to a condition known as protein-losing nephropathy (PLN). This condition results in protein loss from the kidneys and can be fatal. Inflammatory bowel disease, renal dysplasia, Addison's disease and cancer are other health issues Wheaten terriers may develop.



Sunday, March 4, 2018

The Mysterious KERRY BLUE TERRIER

Kerry Blue Terrier - Photo: Flickr
The Kerry Blue Terrier is one of the most mysterious breeds of terriers. This is because of the fact that even though the breed has been known by the Irish for at least 150 years, nobody really knows where they came from or how they were first bred. They are also coined as the Irish Blue Terrier.

Various legends are told in order to explain the appearance of the Kerry blue terrier breed. Some say that the peasants bred them for hunting purposes since noblemen monopolized the use of wolfhounds. Thus, noblemen hunted with their wolfhounds, while peasants poached with their KBTs.

Another legend speaks of a wrecked Russian ship that contained a blue dog. This dog swam into Irish shores and there, mated with the local terrier population. This, of course, started the genetic pool of blue Kerry terriers.

Whatever the case, the blue Kerry terrier sure has a colourful history, and today is quite an uncommon terrier breed. It started as a working dog, helping hunters bring in prey. It would also be trained as a police dog by the English. Today, it is considered to be one of the best breeds of dogs that one can own. This is part of its excellent abilities as a watchdog.

One thing that is amazing about owning a Kerry Blue Terrier as a pet is that this breed is adaptable to every situation. It can be a hardworking hunting dog, a vigilant watchdog, or a champion in a dog show. People who are blessed to have a Kerry Blue Terrier even say that once you are a Kerry lover, you are forever a Kerry lover. That's just how we all feel about our terriers!

There are some terrier characteristics which may cause a bit of trouble for your dog. Like all terriers, the Kerry Blue Terrier can get into fights with other dogs due to their protective personality. In order to prevent this, you need to ensure that your Kerry is properly socialized. Usually, this is taken care of by the breeder before you take your dog home.

Most people, when they are getting a pet, often ask the question of whether or not a pet can be housebroken easily. Thankfully enough, the Kerry Blue Terrier is easily trained and is, actually, quite eager to learn and please their owner, making it a fast learner.

Although a Kerry Blue Terrier can become an excellent playmate for children, they should be supervised to ensure proper behaviour, and so that you can nip any unacceptable behaviour in the bud. Children should be taught that they cannot be cruel or aggressive with your Kerry. In fact, they should never be cruel or aggressive with any dog.

The KBT is also one of the more hardy types of terriers because they have very few genetic problems. Before buying a Kerry, however, it is important and a good idea that you ask for eye certifications and hip x-rays. These are the most commonly afflicted parts of the KBT.



Kerry Blue Terriers are not for everyone. Some people may find it a bit too playful, or may not appreciate a Kerry Blue's curiosity. Don't forget, the word terrier comes from, In fact, the word terrier comes from the Middle French "terrier", and before that, the Latin terra, meaning earth.

They were originally bred to hunt rats, rabbits, badgers, foxes, otters and hares and dogfighting. They like to dig and discover. Since they were intended as companions, especially as hunting partners, they have a habit of following their owners around and are very loyal.

Today, the integrity of this terrier breed lies in the hands of the Kerry Blue Terrier breeders who care for them, nurture them, and make sure that they have great homes to stay in.

by Kimberly Edwards  - Article Source: EzineArticles



Tuesday, February 13, 2018

AIREDALE TERRIER - The King of the Terriers

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Photo  by E Haug 
The Airedale Terrier is a medium 45 to 65-pound dog that usually reaches between 22" and 24". Known as the King of the Terriers, they are largest of the Terrier breeds recognized by the AKC. It is a compact little powerhouse that is all terrier when it comes to chasing little animals or appeasing its curiosity.

Airedale Terriers are typically tan on the ears, head, chest, undersides, legs, and sometimes on the shoulders.  They are black or grizzle on the sides and upper parts of the body.  Sometimes they have a red mixture on the black or white markings on the chest.  Certain strains of the breed also have a small white patch on the chest.  Their wiry, dense outer coat requires regular grooming.

If you are looking for a dog with plenty of stamina and energy, look no further.   The Airedale Terrier is full of energy and needs daily exercise and play.  Generally speaking, they do best with older well-behaved children and are not ideal for homes with smaller pets as terriers have the tendency to chase small animals and vermin.  They can do well with other dogs, especially if they are socialized from puppyhood.  They are loyal and protective of their family.  They love to learn and can be trained easily provided training is fun and not monotonous.

The breed dates itself back to 18th century England. The breed is a cross between an Otterhound and a Waterside Terrier.  They were bred for hunting small game and were later used in big game hunting, police work and as an army dog in WWII.  The Airedale Terrier is now considered more of a family pet than working dog.  However, they do love to work and have tasks to do and still make good hunting and tracking dogs

For a family that enjoys outdoors and exercise, the Airedale Terrier is an excellent choice.  Although they can work with other pets and dogs, a one pet household seems more ideal for their needs unless they grow up with other family pets.  The Airedale Terrier is a great pet for the family on the go.




Thursday, February 8, 2018

Fact Sheet: NORWICH TERRIER

(Original Title: Norwich Terrier - Facts You Must Know Before Adopting A Norwich Terrier)

Norwich Terrier
Photo by Just chaos
Breed Description

The sturdy, robust, and compact Norwich Terrier is an alert and enthusiastic breed that could sometimes look bewildered. This breed has erect ears, adding to a more alert appearance. This small dog weighs around 11-15 pounds and reaches between 8-10 inches tall.

Coat

The straight, hard, and wiry coat of the Norwich Terrier reach around 1-2 inches long. Their low-lying fur is longer on their neck and shoulders, along with short and smooth whiskers and eyebrows. The coat of this breed comes in red or brown colors. Some colors exist, too, including black and gray.

Activity

The Norwich Terrier is relatively energetic. They love going for walks or playing ball with their families. With their thick coat, they will be able to tolerate all kinds of weather. This breed enjoys digging holes, and owners should, therefore, be watchful of this trait. These dogs will generally do well in apartment dwelling for as long as they get to go outside for exercise.

Temperament

With small yet hardy personality, the Norwich Terrier is remarkably intelligent, courageous, and affectionate. They are assertive, but will not typically show aggressive behavior. These active terriers are energetic and thrive on an active lifestyle. They are known to be eager to please, yet will definitely have minds of their own. Aside from an active life, they also thrive on the companionship of their owners. So, these terriers should never be kept in a kennel. These small dogs are great with children, but will only get along with other animals provided that they were previously introduced.

Overview

As most terriers were primarily bred to hunt a particular animal, the Norwich Terrier is no different. In fact, they were created to hunt rodents, and small creatures as their size will be too small to go for anything larger.

Care

In terms of grooming, the Norwich Terrier should be combed and brushed daily. A great deal of clipping will not be required, though. They are very light shedders, and bathing should only be done when necessary with a dry shampoo.

The undercoat of this breed is of utmost important to care for, and should ideally be brushed with steel comb once every week to remove dead hair and prevent matting. Their coats must also be stripped twice a year, ideally in the autumn and spring.





Training

The Norwich Terrier is entertaining and comical but challenging to train. Socialization is crucial especially while they are puppies, and basic manners should be introduced as early as possible. Just like the Norfolk Terrier, this small terrier has been developed to independently hunt without the help or support of a man. Due to this, they will typically do things their own way, at their own speed.

Character

The Norwich Terrier is a little dog with a remarkable instinct of knowing what's going on. They particularly love to be the center of everything, and will generally get along with other pets once introduced, and even love playing with children.



Thursday, January 11, 2018

Some Tips for Keeping Your AIREDALE TERRIER Dog Well-Behaved

Hatti.
Photo by cazstar
Here are some tips you can use to keep your Airedale terrier pet dog well-behaved:

1) Can’t teach an old dog – You have to start training your Airedale terrier pet dog as early as possible. This is because of the fact that the earlier an Airedale terrier pet dog learns a trick, the faster they will be able to learn it. This doesn’t just apply to tricks. It also applies to general behavior. When your Airedale terrier pet dog is still just a puppy, you need to start training it. This way, the behavioral training that you give it will be ingrained into the Airedale terrier pet dog’s brain. This way, proper behavior becomes almost instinctive to the Airedale terrier pet dog.

2) Use, don’t abuse – Various training methods are made available to you by various experts. However, there’s one thing you should know: they only work with proper use. Some people make use of the leash or of the crate to abuse their animals. What you need to know is that each method of training can only be effective if used in a way that will not harm the animals. You need to be firm but gentle with your animal when you are trying to train it.


Use the various implements humanely in such a manner that will encourage your dog to behave well and not scare it from behaving badly.

3) Habit inside, habit outside – Before taking your Airedale terrier pet dog outside, try to observe its behavior inside. This will give you a clue as to how the Airedale terrier pet dog will act outside the house. Many people say that a dog’s behavior inside a house is very different from the way that the same dog will act in outside environments. This is not true. By observing the inside behavior of your Airedale terrier pet dog, you will realize how it will respond to you outside.

If your Airedale terrier pet dog does not listen to your commands inside the house, how can you expect it to listen to your commands outside the house where there are things a lot more interesting to a dog than your commands are?

4) Keep your temper – Training an Airedale terrier pet dog can understandably be very frustrating. However, you should not lose your temper. Negative actions such as hitting or shouting at your dog will not accomplish anything positive. Sometimes, we have a tendency to take out our frustrations on helpless pets. Do not blame your problems on the dog. If you know that you are having a bad day, do not even think about training your dog. All that you might get from the ordeal is a bad case of hyperacidity. Your dog will learn nothing and that would only increase your frustration.





5) Timing – Timing is always important. You need to make corrections regarding your Airedale terrier pet dog’s behavior while those corrections are still relevant. If you praise or correct the wrong timing, you would only end up confusing the dog. Actually, the best timing you can use is to correct the Airedale terrier pet dog before he or she even starts to misbehave.

These five tips can help you a lot in keeping your Airedale terrier pet dog’s behavior in check. By following these tips, you can make training your dog an easy task.




Tuesday, December 5, 2017

WEST HIGHLAND TERRIER Dogs - Are They Right For Your Lifestyle?

English: Westie puppies Česky: Štěňata westíka
English: Westie puppies Photo credit: Wikipedia)
West Highland Terrier Dogs - When setting out to find a Westie is right for your lifestyle and your family, you have to consider a few things first. Bear in mind that owning a Westie is a very special experience and the fact is that you are adding a member to your family. Therefore you are about to bring a major change to your life.

Moreover, a healthy Westie can live for 12-15 years or more, so it is important for you and your future Westie, that you give all this some serious thought. You must be prepared to invest considerable time, money and patience in training your Westie to be a good companion.

Make sure your Westie gets enough attention and exercise. Spend the money it takes to provide proper veterinary care including but certainly not limited to:
  • Annual vaccines
  • Heartworm testing
  • Monthly year-round preventive
  • Spaying/neutering.

Keep the breeder informed and updated on the Westies accomplishments and problems. Have the patience to accept responsibility for the Westie despite inevitable life changes such as new babies, kids going off to school, divorce, relocation, or returning to work.

All you need to do is just take your time and find a Westie that matches your lifestyle. Most of all, don't get a Westie on impulse or because it is trendy. Trends just come and go, but your Westie will stay with you for a longer time.

You'll probably see lots of adorable puppies. But try to think of your future Westie as an adult. Every puppy is a cute ball of fluff, but you need to know what it will grow up to be.

You can begin by studying the breed's history, as it is common knowledge that all breeds were developed to perform a specific function. If you know that purpose and the history of the breed, then you will have a good idea of its needs, its temperament, and personality and you will be best prepared for a long-lasting, successful relationship.

Bear also in mind that having a Westie creates responsibilities. Also, make sure you will have quality time to spend with your Westie. There are many resources to help you in your search. Start at surfing the Internet, searching for more information on Westies, as well as on clubs and kennels.

Here are some other suggestions. Take a look at some of the many books, magazines, websites and videos you have at hand. Consult with your local all-breed club, boarding kennel, or veterinarian. Go to a Westie show and talk to Westie breeders and owners, when they are not busy grooming or showing.You can also test to see what Westie you should choose to match your lifestyle.

Also called the Westie, this terrier has its origins, as the name already suggests, in the western Scottish Highlands.

In this sheer and rocky landscape, small robust terriers were used for the hunt on foxes, wildcats, otters, and badgers. The exhausting hunt, usually in the pack, required much courage and endurance as the hard climate required. Besides the hunt, the Westies were also put into the guarding of house and yard of their owner.

It is probable that the West Highland White Terrier and all the terriers of Scotland came from the same stock. The Scotties, Cairns, Dandie Dinmonts, and West Highland Whites are branches of the same tree and its roots.

The most important branch of the predecessors of the Westie was in the 18th Century from the Poltalloch terriers of the Colonel Malcolm from Argyllshire.

As the legend goes, a reddish Westie of his, emerging from cover, was mistakenly shot for a fox. Malcolm is said to have decided on the spot to breed only white Westies that could be readily identified in the field.



The breed was listed officially as the West Highland White Terrier in 1907 at the Crufts Westie show in England. The name was chosen for the rugged character of the Westies and the area of their development.

Westies were originally bred for controlling the population of rats, fox, otter and other vermin. Nowadays, this charming terrier is mostly bred as a companion or family Westie. The Westie belongs to the Terrier group and has full recognition of the most important Kennel Clubs worldwide.

(Disclaimer: Any information contained in this site relating to various medical, health and fitness conditions of Westies or other animals and their treatments is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice provided by your own veterinarian. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing the health of any animal. You should always consult and check with your own vet or veterinarian.)