Showing posts with label Dog Fact Sheet. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dog Fact Sheet. Show all posts

Friday, September 14, 2018

NORFOLK TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Norfolk Terrier - Dogs of the World



Friday, August 10, 2018

Fact Sheet: APPENZELL MOUNTAIN DOG

(Original Title: Appenzell Mountain Dog)

Appenzeller Sennenhund
Appenzeller Sennenhund (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Breed group: Mastiff
Weight: 49-70 lbs
Height: Males 22-23 inches, females 18-20 inches

Overview
There is not complete agreement on the origin of this breed. The one theory is that the Appenzell Mountain dog is a native breed that dates back to the Bronze Age, and the other is that is descended from the Molossus and the later brought into Switzerland by the Romans. These dogs are one of the four Swiss Sennenhunds, with the Appenzell Mountain dog being the rarest of the four. These dogs make outstanding herd dogs, seeing that they are without a tire in the mountains. The Appenzell are also very flexible when it comes to pulling carts, and they were used to bring cheese and milk to the merchants in town from the valleys. This is a very hard working breed that loves to work with the herd when it is not guarding its master.

Temperament
The Appenzell Mountain dog has a very high intelligence, and they are also very active. They do well with other animals and people, especially when they have been socialized well from an early age onwards. These dogs can, however, be wary of strangers. This is an active breed that will need a lot of exercises. They will flourish with agility and skill training, but also be a bit noisy and get bored easily. This is definitely not an indoor dog. This dog is a tough dog that has sober habits. The Appenzell Mountain dog will be devoted to the whole family, but will probably bond closely with one member.

Care
This breed has a straight-haired double coat that does not require a lot of care. Dead hears can be removed with a rubber brush from time to time to keep their coats in a good condition.


Training
This breed will do best in a consistent and well-balanced training environment. It is important for this dog to be socialized well with different types of situations, animals, and people. Due to the intelligence of these dogs, they will learn very quickly. These dogs like to be given a task to complete. The Appenzell Mountain dog loves to be outdoors, especially when its trainer is close by. This dog will do very well in skills trials and games of catch. The Appenzell can be very noisy, but they are outgoing dogs that make excellent watchdogs. The Appenzell Mountain dog is a very pleasant and warm dog, but prefers the freedom of wide open spaces and therefore not well suited for indoor living.

Health problems
The Appenzell Mountain dog is a very tough and healthy breed that has no breed-specific conditions worth reporting.



Friday, May 25, 2018

Fact Sheet: SAMOYED Dog

(Original Title: Samoyed Dog Breed)


Happy dog
Photo by scottfeldstein

Description.

The Samoyed are medium-sized dogs, with muscular bodies', and a height for the male dog of 21-23° inches which weigh in at 45-65 pounds and the female bitch stand 19-21 inches with a weight of 35-50 pounds. They have a fairly fluffy coat that hides a great deal of their muscular definition. Their deep-set bowman shaped eyes are a dark colour and are set a little on the wide side. With a medium to long tail which they carry rolled on their back. The feet are flat and have an ample covering of hair, with the legs being muscular and solid. But it is a double thickness and very dense the longer hair is set within the thick undercoat and is harsh in feel. Their neck is exaggerated by the hair and appears to form a ruff, which would keep the neck warm in their native climate.

History. 
The Samoyed is a very old breed, even ancient. They were native to Siberia and used by the hunters and fishermen. Some were used as sledge dogs, which doubled up as security by guarding the homes and also used in the herding of reindeer. It was common to these dogs to sleep with people in the household, to keep them warm. The dogs were first taken to England by the famous explorer Robert Scott, in 1889. The breed was further refined in England and started its worldwide spread from there. The breed was first recognized by the AKC in 1906.

Temperament. 
They tend to be a happy-go-lucky friendly dog, with a playful nature. They can become very devoted to their owners. They integrate well with others and unfortunately get on with pretty much anybody, I say unfortunately because this will include anybody who tries to burgle your house. However, all is not lost because their excited barking will alert you to a stranger being near, but it will be up to you to tackle them. As with most dogs training needs to be started as early as possible, and the dogs' master needs to assert themselves over this dog, in a calm friendly but firm manner. They are in themselves a stable breed but do require a lot of exercises both physical and mental. If adequately trained and cared for these dogs are exceptional in their good nature.

Health issues. 
The breed is particularly prone to hip dysplasia and is known to be at risk of diabetes. Along with a predisposition to skin allergies and PRA affecting the eyes, they are overall a fairly healthy breed with a life expectancy of 12 to 15 years.





Grooming. 
You only need to see their coat to realise that they are going to require extensive brushing and combing. As seasonal shedders, they moult very heavily, and brushing and combing of their coat should probably be conducted more frequently during the moulting season. Most commonly though, normal grooming will keep your dog clean so frequent bathing will not be a requirement.

Living conditions. 
Whilst these dogs can adapt to living in an apartment, if they are exercised well, they are quite active indoors and if your space is limited this may be a problem. They do not tolerate hot weather very well, which means you may well have to exercise them more gently in the summer months. They do integrate well with families and can be great with children, just bear in mind their boisterous nature may cause a few tumbles during its play time if he gets too excitable. However, other pets in the house should not be a problem, but it is a good idea to supervise when small animals are available.

    By Scott Allan Lipe
    For more information on different Dog Breeds, Dog Training and Teacup Puppies for sale including Yorkies, Chihuahuas, and Morkies please visit our websites below.

    Samoyed Dog Breed

    Article Source: EzineArticles


Thursday, April 26, 2018

Fact Sheet: BRUSSELS GRIFFON

(BRUSSELS GRIFFON Dog Breed Profile)

English: brussels griffon weights 7 pounds, co...
Brussels Griffon weights
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Description:
There are actually three types of Brussels Griffon: 
Belgian Griffon
Brussels Griffon
Petit Griffon. 
All are considered to be toy dogs with a shoulder height of 7 to 8 inches and a weight of 6 to 12 pounds. The stop of the dog is very pronounced and the muzzle is short. The tail of the Griffon is usually docked and the ears can either be clipped or left natural. The coat of this dog comes in two varieties, smooth and rough. The rough coated Griffon has a wiry, longish coat with distinctive facial hair. The coat of the smooth is short and glossy. The Griffon will generally live to be 12 to 15 years old. This dog is also known as the Petit Brabancon and the Griffon Bruxellois.

History:
The first artistically rendered appearance of the Brussels Griffon is in the painting 'The Arnolfini Wedding' by Jan Van Eyck. This masterpiece was created in 1435 and shows the Griffon looking confidently out of the painting. The Griffon was used as a ratter in stables in its native Belgium and it is thought that the original dog was crossed with the Affenpinscher, the Pug, and the King Charles Spaniel to arrive at the dog with which we are familiar today.

Temperament:
The Brussels Griffon makes an excellent companion dog and is cheerful and confident. It loves to cuddle up with its favorite person and will expect plenty of attention. This small dog sometimes needs to be reminded of its size when trying to dominate dogs much larger than it is. The Brussels Griffon tends to bond strongly with one person and should be considered a one person dog. As such, it is probably not a suitable dog for homes with children, especially small ones. However, the Brussels Griffon does get along well with other household pets.

Health Issues:
As with all short-faced breeds, the Brussels Griffon can suffer from breathing problems. It should also be kept as cool as possible when the weather is hot. This breed can also have problems with their eyes, such as cataracts. The Griffon often experiences trouble with whelping and caesarian sections are often called for.


Grooming:
Although the smooth coated Brussels Griffon does not need more than a weekly brushing to keep the coat in good condition, the rough-coated dog will need rather intensive grooming. The dog should be brushed every day to keep mats and tangles from forming. Some people prefer to clip the rough coat shorter for ease of care. It is sometimes necessary to trim the hair on the hindquarters for sanitary reasons.

Living Conditions:
As the Brussels Griffon is exclusively a companion dog, it belongs in the house or apartment with the human with whom it has bonded. It is quite active and playful indoors and will get much of its exercise in this fashion. The Brussels will appreciate a walk every day, however, and should be given the opportunity to stretch its legs. This dog is unable to live outside and as it can suffer from heat stroke easily, should be kept out of the sun during hot weather.

    For more information on different Dog Breeds, Dog Training and Teacup Puppies for sale including Yorkies, Chihuahuas, and Morkies please visit our websites below.
    Brussels Griffon Puppies - Puppies or Dogs [http://www.puppies-or-dogs.com]
    Article Source: EzineArticles



Sunday, April 8, 2018

Fact Sheet: DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

(Original Title: Dandie Dinmont Terrier - Facts You Must Know Before Adopting
Dandie Dinmont Terrier)

Dandie Dinmont Terrier - GCH King's Mtn. Angelina Ballerina 02
Photo by Petful.com
Breed Description

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small breed with a distinctive top-knot hair on the head of this terrier dog. Primarily bred to go to the ground, this breed is a low-stationed working dog with an arched top line. They are between 8-11 inches tall at the shoulders and weighs from 18-24 pounds at the average.

Coat

The Dandie Dinmont has a coat mixed with rough top coat and silky undercoat, as demonstrated over their heads. The distinctive hairs on their heads are usually kept relatively long and may shroud the eyes if left without trimming for too long. Their coat color comes in silver and black coat, or reddish-yellow color that is commonly called "mustard".

Activity

These dogs need to be walked on a daily basis and will enjoy playing in the park, or any other securely fenced open areas.

Temperament

The breed is fun-loving and affectionate, making them an excellent companion dog. They are determined, lively, and willful, with intelligent and independent nature, bold, yet dignified. They are aloof with strangers, often protective of family and property. They are great with well-behaved kids, and babies, as long as they were reared with them. Dominance varies greatly, as some males may be aggressive with male dogs in their home, while females can be bad-tempered and snappy.

Overview

Also known as the Dandie or the Hindlee Terrier, this is a breed of dog that belongs to the Terrier group. This interesting little breed has a body similar to that of a Dachshund, but they have a wavy and long coat, with puffed white hair on top of their heads.

Care

These dogs require regular brushing. They need professional grooming, as dead hair should be plucked at about once or twice in a year.

Training

These dogs are tricky to train. They require firm, consistent, and fun training sessions to make these puppies interested. They are intelligent but intelligent enough to question the judgment of their trainers. It is therefore imperative to use positive reinforcement as your approach to asserting your stand as the leader of the pack.

Housebreaking is an important part of training for new owners of these puppies. The key is to be around all the time while they are small, and never allowing them access to the areas where they can muddle up around the house.



Crate training is known to be effective for your dog's training as this allows them the opportunity for quiet time in a space where he can make it his territory, as well as a chance for early housetraining owners can work on.

Character

These dogs are generally lively, independent, and affectionate. They are friendly but can be stubborn at times. They are bold, unafraid, but remains dignified, even when playing. They are extremely loyal and can make excellent guard dogs. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is intelligent, playful, and fun especially when given enough attention.




Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Fact Sheet: VIZSLA Dog Breed

(Original Title: Vizsla Dog Breed Profile)


Curious about photography
Photo  by robot-girl 
Description:
The Vizsla is a medium-sized dog. This is a more lightly built dog than the Redbone Coonhound with which it is sometimes mistaken. The Vizsla dog has a shoulder height of 22 to 26. The bitch will be 2 less. The weight of this dog is 40 to 60 pounds depending on sex. The coat of the Vizsla is a rusty reddish color. The tail of the Vizsla is generally docked to about two-thirds of its original length. The Vizsla will generally live for 12 to 15 years. It is also known as the Hungarian Pointer, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointing Dog, and Rovidszoru Magyar Vizsla.

History:
Long, long ago Magyar tribes arrived in what is now Hungary with their hunting dog, the forerunner of the Vizsla. The oldest pictorial reference to the Vizsla is an old stone etching showing the dog with its owner, who also has a falcon for hunting. The Vizsla was first mentioned in writing in 1357. As the aristocracy developed a fondness for this dog, it was also bred in with the Transylvanian Hound and the extinct Turkish Yellow Dog. Down to only about a dozen dogs after World War II, the Vizsla made a comeback thanks to the efforts of dedicated breeders.

Temperament:
The Vizsla is very gentle with the family. It is also a dog that has a very high energy level that needs to be addressed every day. This dog does best with children if it has been given enough exercise, otherwise, it might be too excitable for young children. This is a working dog and thrives on training and the chance to hunt or perform at agility. Not being given enough exercise can be very detrimental to this dog's mental and physical health. The Vizsla can be socialized to get along with other dogs. Unfortunately, the Vizsla can probably never be trusted with small household pets.

Health Issues:
Despite the restricted gene pool from which this dog made a comeback, the Vizsla is surprisingly free of most genetic disorders. This dog can suffer from hip dysplasia and food allergies, however.


Grooming:
The grooming requirements of the Vizsla are minimal. The dog should be brushed once a week to keep the coat free of dead hairs and to distribute the natural oils. This dog does not often need a bath but can be given a dry shampoo instead. As with all dogs with floppy ears, the ears of the Vizsla should be checked regularly to make sure they are clean and dry.

Living Conditions:
The Vizsla will be perfectly happy in the house with its human family, as it craves attention. The Vizsla will not mind being able to sleep on its owner's bed if allowed. This dog is not at its best in an apartment, however, it is quite active inside and with no easy outlet for its energy, it can become highly strung and destructive. Regardless of where it lives, the Vizsla must be given a great deal of exercise every day. It will love a walk of several miles and should have a chance to run off the leash occasionally.




Friday, March 23, 2018

Fact Sheet: GOLDENDOODLE

(Original Title: Goldendoodle - Essential Breed Information)
Goldendoodle Nanuk at 5 months
Goldendoodle Nanuk at 5 months
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today crossing breeds have become a popular option, as people enjoy crossbreeding for the best traits of both breeds. One crossbreed that has only been around for about 20 years happens to be the Goldendoodle. This breed was created around the same time that the Labradoodle was also created and they are very similar breeds. If you're considering the purchase of your own Goldendoodle, here is a look at important breed information you'll need to know.

Origin of the Goldendoodle
First, it's a good idea to learn a bit about the origin of the Goldendoodle. This dog happens to be a Golden Retriever Poodle mix. Some of the other names that are commonly used for this breed include Goldie Poos, Groodles, and Golden Poos. Since some other poodle hybrids that were smaller were very successful, breeders soon decided to try breeding Goldens with a Poodle, making a larger pet that is allergy free. The hybrid turned out wonderfully and this breed quickly became popular.

Hybrid Vigor
The Goldendoodle displays hybrid vigor since they are a first generation cross in most cases today. Basically, this means that since the dogs are the very first cross between two lines of purebreds that are unrelated, they end up growing better and are healthier than both of the parent lines of dogs. This cross has created Goldendoodles that are intelligent, easy to train, friendly, and affectionate. However, as other generations are created, the vigor can be lost.

Breed Description
The parent lines of the Goldendoodle both happen to be water dogs and hunters. When it comes to the physical appearance of the Golden Retriever Poodle mix, they may look like a poodle that curls relaxed or they may even look like a retriever that is very shaggy. However, usually, their look is somewhere between the two. Usually, the length of their fur ends up being between 4-8 inches in length. Their coat color can vary. A few of the colors may include versions of chocolate, black, gold, cream, apricot, phantom, or party. As most of the other poodle crosses, the Goldendoodle usually does not shed much, which means that they are great for families that have allergies that are mild.

About Miniature Goldendoodles
It is possible to find miniature Goldendoodles as well. This occurs when a toy or miniature Poodle is one of the parents. A miniature Goldendoodle will usually be between 15-30 pounds. For those who want smaller dogs, the miniature Golden Retriever Poodle mix is a great option.

Weight and Height of the Breed
When it comes to the weight and the height of the Goldendoodle, it depends on the parentage of the dog. Usually, to get the average weight of adult dogs, you can add the weight of each parent together and then divide it in half. Of course, in every litter that is born, some puppies may end up being heavier or lighter than the weight that is projected. Standard Goldendoodles are usually predicted to be over 45 pounds when they reach adulthood. Miniatures usually are below 30 pounds. However, it is important to note that Goldendoodles in the past have ended up weighing over 100 pounds.

Temperament
One of the wonderful things about the Goldendoodle is their temperament. They are wonderful dogs for families and are both obedient and intelligent. These dogs are devoted to family and are extremely friendly. The Golden Retriever Poodle mix is wonderful with children and very good with other pets too. You'll find that they are happiest when they are around humans. Since they are eager to please, they love to learn, and they are very intelligent, they are extremely easy to train.

Health Issues
If you plan on owning your own Goldendoodle, it's a good idea to know about any possible health issues that may occur. The good news is that since the Goldendoodle is a hybrid cross, they usually will live longer and will be much healthier than the lines of the parents. However, these dogs are prone to the genetic diseases that the Standard Poodle and Golden Retriever deal with. While there are no big health concerns to worry about with the Goldendoodle, a few of the minor concerns to keep in mind include patella, PRA, Elbow, CHD, and VonWillebrand's disorders. It is suggested that these dogs get vWD, eye, and hip tests are done.



Grooming Your Goldendoodle
The Goldendoodle ends up with fur that is usually a combination of poodle and retriever like hair. Fur may reach 4-8 inches in length if it is not clipped. It is important to ensure their fur is combed on a regular basis. If you plan on clipping the Goldendoodle, this should be done several times within every year for the best results.





Sunday, March 18, 2018

Fact Sheet: BLACK MOUTH CUR

Black Mouth Cur - Photo: Pexels

Weight: Male: 55-95, Female: 40-80 lbs
Height: Male: 22-28, Female: 18-26 inches

Overview
The Black Mouth Cur was first bred in the Southern part of the United States. These dogs were intended to be very versatile working dogs. This breed has excellent hunting skills, especially for the hunting of squirrel, raccoon, bear, boar, and mountain lion. The Black Mouth Cur is also used for the herding of cattle, and also as guard dogs. These dogs are primarily working dogs, but they also make fine companions.

Temperament
It is well known that the Black Mouth Cur makes an excellent hunting dog, and many hunters prefer these dogs above any other. Some of their preys include boar, bear, coon, squirrel, and deer. This dog will never back away, and will kill and catch medium-sized game without any hesitation. The Black Mouth Cur is also very capable at treeing and baying and will almost never trot. When hunting, the Black Mouth Cur will either walk or engage in a ground-covering run. These dogs are enthusiastic hunters, but they can also her cattle if needed. Although these dogs are persistent and intense when working, they are very protective and kind toward their families. You will find that they are devoted and without fear, and they love to please their master. The male dogs are particularly loving toward women, but wary toward strange men.

Care
The Black Mouth Cur has short hair, and they are very easy to groom. They can be combed and brushed to remove their dead and loose hairs. These dogs should only be bathed when necessary, as excessive bathing will dry out the skin and will result in skin problems. Their ear canals should also be kept free of hair, and their toenails should be clipped.


Training
This is a breed that is very sensitive and clever. It is recommended that they receive proper obedience and socialization training. This is a dog that will not react well to cruel and unkind training methods. The Black Mouth Cur will do best with training sessions that are diverse and not too long. The training environment for these dogs should also be respectful, fair and consistent. The Black Mouth Cur is very voice sensitive, and a stern voice should be used carefully for the best results to be obtained. This breed should be trained as soon as they arrive at your home. The Black Mouth Cur should not be left alone with other animals.

Health problems
The Black Mouth Cur has no known health issues.


   



Thursday, February 22, 2018

Fact Sheet: BERGER PICARD

Purdy, Berger Picard
Berger Picard - Photo  by Lil Shepherd 
Breed group: Herding
Weight: Male: 60-70; Female: 50-60 lbs
Height: Male: 23.5-25.5; Female: 21.5-23.5 inches

Overview
The Berger Picard is perhaps the oldest of all the French shepherd dogs. This breed arrived in Picardy in AD 800. These dogs have been named after the Picardie region in north-eastern part of France. Some experts believe this breed is connected to the more popular Briard and Beauceron. Other believe they share their origin with the Dutch and Belgian Shepherd dogs. The Berger Picard appeared at the initial French dog show in 1863, but the breed's appearance did not lead to popularity as a show dog. After the two World Wars, this breed was almost extinct and is still very rare. There about 3000 of these dogs in France, and about 350 in Germany.

Temperament
It is advised that you should have some previous dog ownership experience before getting one of these dogs. The Berger Picard has a very sensitive and self-assured nature. You will find that these dogs are also extremely loyal and calm. They get along well with children, dogs, and other animals - especially if they have been raised with them. The Berger Picard is a very diligent, lively and alert dog. The Berger Picard will however not do well if they are cut off or uncared for - and this might lead to destructive behavior. This breed will do very well guardian of their families, livestock and their territories.

Care
The coat of the Berger Picard should only be combed or brushed two times a month, especially when they are shedding during spring and autumn. The fur of these dogs should not be washed or trimmed. It can be cleaned off when dirty. This is a very light shedding breed, and they also have no doggie smell.


Training
This breed is extremely intelligent, and also very quick to learn. The Berger Picard breed will need to be socialized and trained in obedience from very early on. These dogs also have a very stubborn streak, and can also be very temperamental. It is advised that their training sessions are short and diverse to avoid boredom. This is a breed that will not respond positively to cruel or unkind training methods. Training should be done in a patient, fair and firm manner.

Health problems
Some of the Berger Picard's suffer from hip dysplasia, but it is not very common as these dogs are not very heavy. Some of the puppies will also get eye infections because of wind and dirt that gets into their eyes. When older than one year, they will not struggle with this anymore. They also suffer from some genetic eye problems such as the PRA and RD.




Thursday, February 8, 2018

Fact Sheet: NORWICH TERRIER

(Original Title: Norwich Terrier - Facts You Must Know Before Adopting A Norwich Terrier)

Norwich Terrier
Photo by Just chaos
Breed Description

The sturdy, robust, and compact Norwich Terrier is an alert and enthusiastic breed that could sometimes look bewildered. This breed has erect ears, adding to a more alert appearance. This small dog weighs around 11-15 pounds and reaches between 8-10 inches tall.

Coat

The straight, hard, and wiry coat of the Norwich Terrier reach around 1-2 inches long. Their low-lying fur is longer on their neck and shoulders, along with short and smooth whiskers and eyebrows. The coat of this breed comes in red or brown colors. Some colors exist, too, including black and gray.

Activity

The Norwich Terrier is relatively energetic. They love going for walks or playing ball with their families. With their thick coat, they will be able to tolerate all kinds of weather. This breed enjoys digging holes, and owners should, therefore, be watchful of this trait. These dogs will generally do well in apartment dwelling for as long as they get to go outside for exercise.

Temperament

With small yet hardy personality, the Norwich Terrier is remarkably intelligent, courageous, and affectionate. They are assertive, but will not typically show aggressive behavior. These active terriers are energetic and thrive on an active lifestyle. They are known to be eager to please, yet will definitely have minds of their own. Aside from an active life, they also thrive on the companionship of their owners. So, these terriers should never be kept in a kennel. These small dogs are great with children, but will only get along with other animals provided that they were previously introduced.

Overview

As most terriers were primarily bred to hunt a particular animal, the Norwich Terrier is no different. In fact, they were created to hunt rodents, and small creatures as their size will be too small to go for anything larger.

Care

In terms of grooming, the Norwich Terrier should be combed and brushed daily. A great deal of clipping will not be required, though. They are very light shedders, and bathing should only be done when necessary with a dry shampoo.

The undercoat of this breed is of utmost important to care for, and should ideally be brushed with steel comb once every week to remove dead hair and prevent matting. Their coats must also be stripped twice a year, ideally in the autumn and spring.





Training

The Norwich Terrier is entertaining and comical but challenging to train. Socialization is crucial especially while they are puppies, and basic manners should be introduced as early as possible. Just like the Norfolk Terrier, this small terrier has been developed to independently hunt without the help or support of a man. Due to this, they will typically do things their own way, at their own speed.

Character

The Norwich Terrier is a little dog with a remarkable instinct of knowing what's going on. They particularly love to be the center of everything, and will generally get along with other pets once introduced, and even love playing with children.



Saturday, December 9, 2017

Fact Sheet: GREAT DANE (Deutsche Dogge)

(Original Title: Approved Breed Standard of the Great Dane)

Looking for Rabbits
Photo by Laertes
The standard that determines a breed is a genetic blueprint that describes the ideal to which the breed applies. The breeder should always strive to produce a dog depicted by the breed standard. There is no such thing as a "perfect" dog of any breed, which is why responsible breeders work towards eliminating faults and achieving the highest possible standard. Prior to selecting a Great Dane, a novice should read carefully the standard of this breed.

If the Great Dane is for breeding purposes then it is imperative that the standard is fully understood, and that there is a strong support network consisting of other Great Dane breeders. When looking at litters take a knowledgeable friend with you and do not be afraid to ask questions when interviewing the breeder. You will find a detailed description of the complete breed standard of the Great Dane below, as approved by the American Kennel Club.

1. General Appearance of the Great Dane
The regal stature of this breed should combine strength, power, dignity, and elegance with its sheer size. The body is powerful, smoothly muscled and well-formed. As a giant working breed, its conformation is very well-balanced and it must never be clumsy. Its gait should clearly show a powerful drive coupled with a long reach. A Dane is confident, courageous, spirited, always friendly, never timid and dependable. These physical and mental characteristics give this dog the majestic appearance that is a strong standard of the breed. The dog should portray a great masculinity while the bitch should impress femininity. Any deviation from the true Dane breed type defined in this standard is a very serious flaw.

2. Size, Proportion, and Substance of the Great Dane
Any dog under the permitted height is instantly disqualified from any show. A lack of substance and coarseness of coat are equally undesirable traits.

2.1. The Male Great Dane
The male should have a larger frame, heavier bone structure and be more massive throughout than the bitch. He must appear square in the ratio between length and height. At the shoulder, his minimum height is 30 inches, but it is preferable for him to reach 32 inches or more. However, it is more important that his body is well proportioned to his height.

2.2. The Female Great Dane
The bitch is lighter and smaller than the male. In the ratio between length and height, she is square. If she is well proportioned to her height, then it is permissible for her to have a slightly longer body. At the shoulder, the female cannot be shorter than 28 inches. However, she should reach 30 inches or taller, provided she has a body that is proportionate to her height.

3. The Head of the Great Dane
It is essential that the head of the Great Dane belong, distinguished, and expressive. It is finely chiseled all around, but especially below the eyes. The head is rectangular. When looking at the head from the side, it is important that the bridge of the nose be sharply distinguished from the forehead (you want to see a very pronounced stop before the forehead shapes into the nose). The planes of the muzzle and the skull must appear a straight line and be parallel to each other. Underneath and to the inner point of the eye, the skull plate is smooth and free of bony protuberances. It should flow into a smooth square jaw with a deep muzzle. When looking at the head from the top, the sides of the skull are parallel to each other and straight. The bridge of the nose is as wide as possible. The cheek muscles are proportionate to the rectangular, parallel shape of the head and are not prominent. The tip of the nose to the center of the forehead is the same length as the center of the forehead to the rear of the head. From all sides, the head is angular and has flat planes in direct proportion to the size of the dog. The head of the male is more masculine in appearance than the delicately formed bitch. It is permissible to trim the whiskers or leave them natural.

4. The Eyes of the Great Dane
Deep set, dark, medium-sized eyes with intelligent and alert expressions are the standard of the eyes in this breed. Eye-brows are well-developed with tight, almond-shaped eyelids. Permitted are light colored eyes, different colored eyes, and walleye, but they are not encouraged. Very serious faults are haws and Mongolian eyes.

5. The Ears of the Great Dane
Set high on the head is where the ears are. They are of a moderate thickness and are medium in size. The ears are close to the cheek and folded forward. The top line of the folded ear is horizontal and level with the skull. In the days of Great Danes being wild boar hunters, injury prevention happened by cropping the ears. Wild boars used to gore them and they would get torn whilst running through thick brush. Nowadays, ears are still often cropped. If so, then the ear length is directly proportionate to the size of the head and stands erect.

6. The Nose of the Great Dane
In this breed standard, the nose is black. There are only two exceptions to this rule: in the blue Dane the nose is a dark blue-black, and a spotted black nose is permissible on the Harlequin Dane (with a pink colored nose being very undesirable). A split nose is not permitted and is cause for instant disqualification.

7. The Teeth of the Great Dane
Well developed, clean, strong teeth with full dentition are a must in the breed standard of this dog. A "scissors bite" is preferable. This means the incisors of the lower jaw lightly touch the bottom of the inner upper incisors. Misaligned teeth, crowded incisors, and even bites are faults, albeit minor ones. Overshot jaws and undershot jaws are extremely serious flaws.

8. The Neck, Topline, and Body of the Great Dane
The neck is well arched, high set, firm, long and muscular. The underline of the neck is clean. It should widen and flow smoothly into the withers from the nape. The withers must slope smoothly into a broad, short level back. A deep, wide, well-muscled chest devoid of a pronounced sternum is desirable. The Great Dane should have well-sprung ribs, and the brisket should extend to the elbow. The underline of the body must have a well-defined tuck-up and be tightly muscled. The croup should slope slightly and be broad. A high set tail that flows smoothly into the croup and continues into the spine, should sit a little lower than the level of the back. The base of the tail is broad and tapers evenly down to the hock joint. The tail should fall straight down at rest, and curve slightly when running or excited. However, the curve should never rise above the level of the back. Ring or hooked tails are serious faults and a docked tail is a reason for immediate disqualification.

murphy_great_dane
Photo by NJClicks


9. The Fore-quarters of the Great Dane
When viewed from the side, the fore-quarters are strong and muscular. The shoulder-blade should form as near a right angle as possible where it slopes into the upper arm. There is a perpendicular line from the upper tip of the shoulder to the back of the elbow joint. Well developed, firm and securely attached muscles and ligaments must prevent loose shoulders and hold the shoulder-blade to the rib cage. The length of the upper arm is the same as the length of the shoulder-blade. The elbow is directly halfway between the withers and the ground. The pasterns are strong and should slope slightly. The feet are compact, rounded and have well-arched toes. Toes are straight and do not toe either in or out. There is no rolling of the toes inside or outside. Nails are as dark as possible, strong and kept short. The only time nails are lighter is in the Harlequin Dane. The dewclaw is often removed if desired.

10. The Hindquarters of the Great Dane
The hindquarters should portray strength and width. They are muscular and defined. When viewed from behind, the hock joints are straight and may not turn toward the inside or the outside. As with the front feet, the rear feet are well arched, rounded and straight. They may not toe either in or out. Nails are strong, kept short and are as dark as possible in color. In harlequin Danes, it is permissible for them to have a lighter shade. Wolf claws are undesirable and are serious faults.

11. The Coat of the Great Dane
The coat is glossy and smooth in appearance. It is thick, short and clean.

12. Patterns, Markings, and Colours of the Great Dane

12.1. Fawn Danes
The color fawn is yellow gold. Ideally, the fawn Dane wears a black mask. The rims of the eyes and the eyebrows are black. Often black appears on the ears and the tip of the tail. White markings on the chest or toes (socks) are not desired, and neither are dirty colored black-fronted fawns.

12.2. Brindle Danes
In the brindle Dane, the base color is yellow gold. This is always brindled in a chevron pattern of strong black cross stripes. The brindle Dane should have a black mask, with black appearing on the eyebrows and rims of the eyes. Black may also appear on the tips of the ears and tail. The deeper the base color and the more even and distinct the brindle, the more desired will be the color. It is not desired that they have too much or too little of the brindle coloring. White toes and white markings on the chest are undesirable, along with a black-fronted, dirty colored brindle.

12.3. Blue Danes
Blue Danes are only a pure steel-blue. No other coloring is even considered. It is not desired that the blue Dane have white markings on either the chest or on the toes.

12.4. Black Danes
The black Dane is a pure glossy black. White chest or toe markings are very undesirable.

12.5. Harlequin Danes
In the Harlequin Dane, the base color is a pure, clean white with irregularly, well-distributed black torn patches covering the entire body. It is preferable for the Harlequin Dane to have a completely white neck. The black markings must never be so big that the dog looks like it is wearing a blanket, nor should they be so small that they create a dappled or stippled look. A few small grey patches may occur, as well as a white coat with single black hairs showing through. However, this is not encouraged as it tends to give the dog a salt and pepper look and has a dirty effect, which is most undesired.

Any deviation in color or markings as described above shall be faulted according to its severity. Should a Great Dane fall outside the standard color classifications, it is grounds for instant disqualification. For example, a pure white Dane is definitely not of the breed standard. Usually, a white dog is born blind, often deaf and sometimes both. It is a rare genetic defect that causes them to have a snow-white coat. They are promptly sterilized and never used in any breeding program.





13. The Gait of the Great Dane
The gait of this breed should exude strength. It is powerful with long, easy strides that do not allow for rolling, bouncing or tossing of the body or topline. The line of the back is level and parallel to the ground. The long reach should allow for the front paw to make contact with the ground just below the nose, while the head is then carried forward. The powerful rear drive balances the forward reach. There is a natural tendency for the legs to converge in the centreline of balance underneath the body as speed increases. The elbows or hock joints should not twist in or out while the dog is in motion.

14. Temperament of the Great Dane
Confident, spirited, courageous, always friendly, dependable, never timid, never aggressive and very loyal is the ideal temperament of this breed.
When showing a Great Dane, the breed standard is of utmost importance. When choosing a puppy, be aware of the breed standard. The only breed a dog when fully confident that you understand this. Great Danes with minimum height, having split colored noses, docked tails, or not falling into any group described in "Patterns, Markings or Colours" will be instantly disqualified.




Thursday, November 30, 2017

Fact Sheet: DALMATIAN DOG

(Original Title: Dalmatian Dog Breed)
Dalmatian
Photo by pulkitsinha
Of all the dogs, the Dalmatian is easily spotted by its characteristic black spotted features. How these black spots evolved remains a puzzle. The Dalmatian is a European breed, first discovered in Western Yugoslavia. In the USA the Dalmatian was first introduced about 120 years ago and still remains one of the most popular dogs as a pet.

One of the great features of the Dalmatian is its energy level and ability to exercise for long duration. The Dalmatian is not a pet for a small apartment because it needs a lot of room. Training this dog is not difficult but does require a great deal of patience. Training can be difficult at times because the dog often tends to become stubborn. While the Dalmatian does make a great pet dog, it often does get ill tempered with other dogs. Ironically, it is quite friendly with other animals like cats and even horses. For those families with children, the Dalmatian should not be the first pet as it is full of energy and though not intentional, it can be a little rough with small children. However, if the dog is well trained it can make a great loving pet. Despite its size and energy, the dog will rarely harm a child or the owner.

Upkeep and Maintenance

The Dalmatian is one dog that needs regular exercise and thus, it is more suited for people who are active. Simply taking the Dalmatian out to poop will not be adequate as it prefers to go for long outdoor runs. The majority of Dalmatian owners indicate that it makes a great jogging companion. When you first buy the Dalmatian as a puppy it will gladly live in the apartment, but as soon as it grows, it will let you know where it wants to go. Throwing a ball in the park is another way to provide exercise for them as well.

The Dalmatian prefers the cool temperate weather more so than the hot humid climate. When outside, one has to make sure that it is provided with lots of water and a shade to rest under. The dog does tend to become attached to humans and loves people company. Even though the Dalmatian loves the outdoors, it also prefers to be with humans once inside the home.

Health Information

While the Dalmatian generally is disease free, it does suffer from deafness with age. Other common medical ailments that may afflict the dog include an under active thyroid gland, allergies, visual problems and seizures. While CHD has been reported, it is very rare and no where near as common as what occurs in rotteweillers. All Dalmatian owners are recommended that the dog be checked regularly by a veterinarian to screen for the above mentioned health problems

The majority of pet dalmatians live at least 12- 15 years. There are even reports of some Dalmatians living a lot longer. While comparisons are difficult, the dog can be as loving and gentle as a Labrador when it is well trained.

One of the great features of the Dalmatian is its energy level and ability to exercise for long duration. The Dalmatian is not a pet for a small apartment because it needs a lot of room. Training this dog is not difficult but does require a great deal of patience. Training can be difficult at times because the dog often tends to become stubborn. While the Dalmatian does make a great pet dog, it often does get ill tempered with other dogs. Ironically, it is quite friendly with other animals like cats and even horses. For those families with children, the Dalmatian should not be the first pet as it is full of energy and though not intentional, it can be a little rough with small children. However, if the dog is well trained it can make a great loving pet. Despite its size and energy, the dog will rarely harm a child or the owner.

Upkeep and Maintenance

The Dalmatian is one dog that needs regular exercise and thus, it is more suited for people who are active. Simply taking the Dalmatian out to poop will not be adequate as it prefers to go for long outdoor runs. The majority of Dalmatian owners indicate that it makes a great jogging companion. When you first buy the Dalmatian as a puppy it will gladly live in the apartment, but as soon as it grows, it will let you know where it wants to go. Throwing a ball in the park is another way to provide exercise for them as well.

The Dalmatian prefers the cool temperate weather more so than the hot humid climate. When outside, one has to make sure that it is provided with lots of water and a shade to rest under. The dog does tend to become attached to humans and loves people company. Even though the Dalmatian loves the outdoors, it also prefers to be with humans once inside the home.

Health Information

While the Dalmatian generally is disease free, it does suffer from deafness with age. Other common medical ailments that may afflict the dog include an under active thyroid gland, allergies, visual problems and seizures. While CHD has been reported, it is very rare and no where near as common as what occurs in rotteweillers. All Dalmatian owners are recommended that the dog be checked regularly by a veterinarian to screen for the above mentioned health problems



The majority of pet dalmatians live at least 12- 15 years. There are even reports of some Dalmatians living a lot longer. While comparisons are difficult, the dog can be as loving and gentle as a Labrador when it is well trained.