Showing posts with label Dog Fact Sheet. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dog Fact Sheet. Show all posts

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Fact Sheet: MAINE COON CAT

(Original Title: Maine Coon Cat Breed Facts)

English: A Maine Coon cat.
A Maine Coon cat. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Maine Coon cats, the official state cat in Maine, are one of the oldest breeds in North America. As one of the largest breeds, these cats can weigh between 15 to 20+ pounds. Its distinctive characteristics include a long, thick tail; muscular body; broad chest; and tufted ears. Because of their friendly temperament, they are nicknamed "Gentle Giants" by their owners.

Maine Coon History
Their origins are unknown though several popular stories have been passed along the years. One story involves Capt. Charles Coon, an English captain who frequently traveled to New England with long-haired cats aboard his ship. Upon docking, the cats mated with local feral cats and produced lots of offspring. Townspeople referred to the strays as "Coon's cats".

Another folktale involves Queen of France, Marie Antoinette, who attempted an escape with Capt. Samuel Clough in 1793. Her prized possessions, including six beloved cats, were stashed on Clough's ship. Though she didn't escape her beheading, her cats arrived safely in Massachusetts. The cats were described with similar characteristics to the cooncat. Breeders consider the cats' ancestry to go back to the 11th century with the Vikings. History shows the breed existed in the 1800s as a hunting and domestic cats.

In 1967, the breed was officially recognized as a unique breed of domestic cat.




Maine Coon Weight and Size
Maine Coon cats can weigh between 9 to 18 pounds. Males typically weight between 13 to 18 pounds, while females average 9 to 12 pounds. Their large, body shape, rectangle-build, and long hair make them look even larger. They are not full-grown until they reach 3 to 5 years of age. Adults can reach 10 to 16 inches in height.

Their length can be up to 40 inches, including their tails which can be 14 inches long.

Maine Coon Personality
They have several distinctive features, including their long, bushy tail; tufted ears; large, expressive eyes; and ruff around their neck (like a lion). Their eyes are green, gold, green-gold, or copper colors. Their coat is soft and comes in every color and pattern, except pointed patterns, like the Siamese. Their thick fur is shorter on their front legs and shoulders and longer on their back, perches, stomach, and tail. Their tail is often as long as their body.





They have a squared muzzle. They are nicknamed "Gentle Giants" for their affectionate, loving behavior. They are not lapping cats, though they enjoy following family members to offer help with any projects. Their playful nature continues in adulthood. Their distinctive meow -- a chirping sound -- lets owners know when they want their attention, to play, or to mate. They are great pets for families. Generally, they are indoor cats, and they enjoy interacting with people.

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Fact Sheet: BOSTON TERRIER

(Original Title: Boston Terrier: The Standard and Does it Matter?)

Female Boston Terrier with mouth open.
Female Boston Terrier with mouth open. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
To compete with your Boston Terrier you will need to understand the requirements and procedures used for judging. The American Kennel Club releases breed standards for each breed of dog and the Boston Terriers specifications can be found here. You can also check more specialized clubs for the information about required standards for your Boston Terrier. The American Kennel Club is currently revising these standards.

If you want your Boston Terrier to take part in dog shows then you will need to understand the standards and how they relate to your dog.  If you already own or are thinking about owning a Boston Terrier and would like to compete (or show off your dog) here's a guide to understanding breed specifications.

It's important to note that these are descriptions of ideal Boston Terriers.

Competition ranking systems:  Dogs are judged out of a total 100 score. When judging Boston Terriers this score comprises the following elements:

- General Appearance
- Size, Proportion, Substance
- Head - skull shape, characteristics of eyes, ears, muzzle, jaw shape.
- Neck, Topline and Body
- Forequarters
- Gait
- Coat
- Temperament
- Faults in the breed: can lead to instant disqualification

General Appearance

Boston Terriers are intelligent dogs. General appearance needs to be well-balanced; this means all limbs are in proportion. Boston Terriers have a smooth coat which is generally brindle, seal or black. The dog must have even white markings. The body is short and the limbs are strong. The tail is short.

Size, Proportion, Substance

This refers to your dog’s weight. There are several official weight categories but the dog’s weight cannot exceed 25 pounds.

The Boston Terriers legs should be proportioned to give it its characteristic square appearance. The dog looks sturdy and muscular.

In general, the only difference between the male and female is that the bitch generally has more refined features.

Head

The skull is short and flat on top. There should be no wrinkles. The cheeks are flat and the stop is well defined. Boston Terriers should have an alert _expression; reflecting their high intelligence. The eyes should be wide set and large. Boston Terriers with blue eyes - or any hint of blue in their eyes will be disqualified immediately. The ears should be small and stand upright.

The jaw is square and wide with short teeth. The bite is even.

Neck, Towline and Body

The neck should be slightly arched and carry the head gracefully. The neck of the ideal Boston terrier should display an image of balance.

Topline refers to the shape of the dogs back. The back should be shaped in such a way that it completes the square shape of the body.

The chest should be deep with a good width, ribs etc.

Forequarters

The shoulders should be laid back and should slope. IT is this shape which gives Boston Terriers their stylish movement. The elbows should be straight and not protrude in any way. The dewclaws may be removed.

Gait

This refers to the way in which your dog carries himself. The ideal Boston Terrier is sure-footed and straight gaited. The forelegs and hind legs should move in a straight line with perfect rhythm. Each step should be that of grace and power.

Coat

The coat should be short, smooth and fine in texture. Color must be brindle, seal or black with bright markings. The Boston Terrier must have a white muzzle band, white between the eyes and a white chest.

Temperament

The ideal Boston Terrier is friendly and lively. The dog is known for its high intelligence.
Faults in the breed (grounds for disqualification)

Any traces of blue or blue eyes - eyes must be dark





Dudley nose - This means a loss of pigmentation in the nose and it is pink or flesh-colored, however when Boston’s are first born and up to 6 months their nose will be pink.  It will change to the color black so don’t let this hinder you from buying a Boston with a pink nose.

Docked tail - This refers to the practice of cutting tails. It is an outdated practice and your dog will be disqualified.

Lack of required markings

Other serious faults

Wry mouth - one side of the mouth is longer than the other.

Any showing of the tongue/teeth when the mouth is closed

Other faults

Blocky or chunky appearance

Overshot bite/undershot bite - much like human 'faults' this just means an over or under bite.

The Boston Terriers make a great family pet.  They are highly intelligent, loyal, great with children and very easy going.  They are not considered fighters but definitely can hold their own.  If you don’t plan to show your Boston then these qualifications don’t mean a thing.  Boston Terriers are the perfect all around companion just the way they are.



Thursday, November 15, 2018

Fact Sheet: POODLES

(Original Title: Poodles - One of the World's Smartest Breeds)

English: Standard black poodle haircut
Standard black poodle haircut (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Come with me as I take a look at the Wonderful World of Poodles.

History
Although the national breed of France, the Poodle actually originated in Germany where it was used as a water retriever. Many believe the name "Pudel" comes from the German word "pudel" which means "one who plays in the water."

In fact, the famous "Poodle Clip" was created by hunters to help the breed swim faster and more efficiently. The clip was not created as a decorative element. It was created to protect certain vital organs and joints of the breed in cold water.

The term "French Poodle" comes from France's capitalization of the breed's intelligence, trainability and eagerness to perform. The French turned poodles into popular circus performers where they gained notoriety and became Louis XVI and Queen Anne's court favorites. They have long since been associated with royalty. Even America's President, Grover Cleveland, owned a poodle.
The Standard Poodle, the largest of the three recognized varieties, is the oldest of the breed. All of the poodle's ancestors were water dogs known for their swimming abilities.

Characteristics
The poodle is the only breed that comes in three AKC registered varieties. The three recognized types are the Standard Poodle, the Miniature Poodle and the Toy Poodle. The Standard is the tallest, measuring over 15 inches. The Miniature is 15 inches or under, but a minimum of 10 inches. The Toy is under 10 inches.

The breed comes in a variety of solid colors, including white, black, apricot and gray.
The Poodle is an exceptionally intelligent dog that excels in obedience training. Its intelligence and ability to learn to make it one of the most popular breeds in the world. It is considered one of the easiest breeds to train. Also, its hypoallergenic coat makes it a favorite amongst owners. It does not shed but does require grooming on a regular basis. The breed adapts well to any living conditions, making it an ideal pet for apartments. However, it is an active dog and does require daily exercise.

The Poodle carries itself proudly and has a very distinct air of dignity. The word "elegant" is most often used to describe the breed. The Poodle is known to be shy, but sharp at the same time. Poodles are reserved with strangers and unless trained at an early age, can bark excessively.

The Standard Poodle (Caniche, Barbone, Chien Canne)
The Standard Poodle is considered to be a large dog of high intelligence and trainability. Elegant, strong and good-natured, it makes an excellent family dog. It has a thick, soft, curly coat that does not shed but requires daily grooming. The ears are wide and hang close to the head. The eyes are very dark and alert. The feet are compact and the breed has an effortless and delightful gait (like walking on air.)

The Standard Poodle is pleasant, happy and generally easy to maintain. It is a loyal companion but unlike the Miniature and Toy varieties of the breed, can be less sensitive to its surroundings and does not bond to one owner or one household as much. It is considered the calmer of the Poodle varieties. Standard Poodles are friendly and excellent with children and other dogs.

Height: 15 inches
Weight: 45-70 pounds
Life Expectancy: 12-15 years

The Standard Poodle is inactive indoors and even a small yard is acceptable. However, they do require daily walks. They are not overly demanding but their temperament is based on their living conditions.
This is a long-lived breed but it is subject to certain genetic diseases like most dogs. Cataracts, skin conditions (from allergies to certain shampoos,) hip dysplasia, runny nose and ear infections are common. Also, the breed is subject to bloating, so only feed it two to three small meals a day instead of one or two large meals.

The Miniature Poodle (Caniche)
The Miniature Poodle is considered to be a medium dog of high intelligence and trainability. More cheerful and playful than the Standard variety of poodle, it has a thick, soft, curly coat that does not shed but requires daily grooming. The ears are wide and hang close to the head. The eyes are very dark and alert. The feet are compact and the breed has a spunky gait.

The Miniature Poodle is an amusing, often curious dog. It is a loyal companion that insists on being included in all of its owner's activities. It can learn tricks effortlessly. It is considered less calm than the Standard Poodle, but not as feisty as the Toy Poodle. Most Miniature Poodles love children and other dogs but they will exhibit jealous tendencies and can display sharp reactions. They can be over playful and must be trained early on that there is a limit to play time. Overall, they are friendly and make excellent pets.

Height: 11-15 inches
Weight: 15-17 pounds
Life Expectancy: 12-15 years

The Miniature Poodle is a good dog for apartment life. They are active indoors but do fine without a yard. However, they do require daily walks. They are not overly demanding but their temperament is based on their living conditions.

This is a long-lived breed but it is subject to certain genetic diseases like most dogs. Cataracts, skin conditions (from allergies to certain shampoos,) hip dysplasia, runny nose and ear infections are common. Also, the breed is subject to bloating, so only feed it two to three small meals a day instead of one or two large meals.

The Toy Poodle (Caniche, Chien Canne, Tea Cup)
The Toy Poodle is considered to be a small dog of high intelligence and trainability. More sensitive than the Standard and Toy varieties, it is also considered the smartest of the three. It has a thick, soft, curly coat that does not shed but requires daily grooming. The ears are small and long and hang close to the head. The eyes are very dark and alert. The feet are compact and the breed has a perfect gait.

The Toy Poodle is sensitive but extremely intelligent. They are very responsive and alert. They can be a delight, but also demanding. They do not like strangers and are reserved around children and other dogs. They are known to snap if they are teased, surprised or mishandled.

They generally bond with one owner for life and they are extremely loyal to that individual and will defend them at all cost, despite their size. However, a true "lap dog," the Toy Poodle expects an equal amount of loyalty and love in return. They adapt better to one dog households and do not do well with small children. The Toy Poodle is considered the least calm of the three poodle varieties.

Height: up to 10 inches
Weight: 3-8 pounds
Life Expectancy: 12-15 years

The Toy Poodle is a good dog for apartment life. They adapt very well to "city life." They require little indoor or outdoor activities but nonetheless, should be socialized with a daily walk. They are demanding dogs and can bark excessively if left alone for long periods of time.

This is a long-lived breed but it is subject to certain genetic diseases like most dogs. Cataracts, skin conditions (from allergies to certain shampoos,) hip dysplasia, runny nose and ear infections are common. Also, the breed is subject to bloating, so only feed it two to three small meals a day instead of one or two large meals.

Choosing Your Poodle
Never is it more essential to choose a responsible and well-respected breeder than when choosing a Poodle Puppy.

As you've already learned from reading this article, dogs come in many different colors, sizes and TEMPERAMENTS!

Poodles especially fall into this category. You can end up with a great pet or a nightmare. Fortunately, with a little bit of research and homework ahead of time, you'll minimize the risk of a difficult pet and maximize your chances of a truly wonderful new companion.

A dog is a companion for life. Making sure you choose the right breed should be step one. When you buy a car, you do not buy the very first car, on the very first lot, on the nearest street, do you? You do a little research. Choosing a dog is no different and this is the ONLY guide I have ever recommended.

Once you've decided on the type of dog you are getting, I suggest you check your local shelter. There are thousands and thousands of dogs in need of good homes and yes, some are pure breed dogs. It's a misconception that only "mutts" can be found in shelters (by the way....some of the best dogs I've owned or simply known, were mutts!)



The name of your local shelter can always be found in your Yellow Pages or online. Or you can simply go to The Humane Society of the United States website. Call your local shelter and ask them to notify you if a specific type or breed of dog comes in. Many are more than happy to keep you on a notify list, but some are not.

Second, I recommend you contact breed rescue organizations. You can Google breed rescue organizations by simply typing in the name of the breed and then the words "rescue organizations." These organizations have dedicated volunteers who work tirelessly to find homes for purebred dogs and yes, many times THEY DO have puppies.

Finally, if you have not found what you are looking for at a shelter or through a rescue organization, I recommend you find a reputable breeder in your area. How will you know if they are reputable? Do some research and do a little homework. Also, try to visit more than one. Don't just buy the first puppy you see. Here are some helpful hints:

General
Check the Better Business Bureau. It's amazing to me how many people forget to do this! It's free and it takes about two seconds. Do it!

Health
1. Do the puppies look clean and do they appear healthy? - Puppies should be bright eyed, active, playful and have an outward appearance of good health (good skin and coat, no unusual odor, clean ears, etc.)
2. Have the puppies been checked for worms? - The puppy should have been examined for worms and the breeder should present you with proof that it has received at least one vaccination before it goes home with you.
3. Have the parents been x-rayed for hip dysplasia? - This is a genetic disorder that many dogs are prone to. The breeder should know all about hereditary diseases and should breed healthy dogs with good temperaments.
Early Socialization
1. Are the puppies friendly? Do they seem happy to be around you? - Puppies should be outgoing, begging to be picked up, competing for attention, and love being held and played with. A very timid puppy might tug at your heartstrings but chances are it's not in good health.
2. Insist on seeing the mother. Is she friendly and attractive? - At 6 weeks old, the mother should no longer be overprotective of her puppies. Insist on seeing the father. How is he with visitors? DO NOT buy puppies whose parents do not have good temperaments.
3. How old are the puppies? - Puppies should not be removed from their litters before 6 weeks. They need to be around their littermates for at least 6 weeks. Seven or eight weeks are even better. However, there is a limit. A puppy that is kept with its littermates past the age of 10 weeks may have become too dependent on its mother.
4. Has the breeder begun to socialize the puppies? - You can tell if a breeder has given each puppy some individual attention, care, and training. Don't be shy. Ask the breeder about this! Ask him, "what have you done to begin socializing this puppy?"
The Breeder
1. Is the breeder experienced with the breed? - The breeder should be able to answer any questions about the breed and agree to help you with any problems. After all, this is why you are buying from a breeder and not a pet shop.
2. Has the breeder gone over both the good and bad characteristics of the breed? - Every breed has good points and bad. No breed can be considered "perfect." The breeder should be honest with you. Some of the best breeders I know refuse to sell certain breeds to families with small children or owners who live in apartments, etc. It seems harsh and unfair, but actually they are doing you and their puppies a favor. Don't fall for the hard sell. There is no reason you should be pressured in any way. If you feel like you are going through a hard sell, walk away.
3. Has the breeder suggested further obedience training? - Many responsible breeders make this a requirement for the sale. All dogs need training. Don't be put off by this. This means they have the best interest of the dog in mind.
4. Does the breeder offer any kind of "starter kit"? - The breeder should give you some materials to take home. The "kit" will probably include some dog food, instructions on the care and feeding of your pup, a list of necessary supplies to have at home, dog care books, and some information on Veterinarians and dog training schools.
5. How about the paperwork? Is it all in order? - You should receive a contract (signed by both you and the seller), and a pedigree. You should not have to pay extra for the pedigree.
Your Part In All This
Are you willing to make a long-term commitment to this puppy? - When you purchase a puppy, you are making a very serious, long-term commitment to the care, training and love of this dog. This animal will live for a dozen years or more and it is your responsibility to do everything possible to keep it well and happy for its entire life.

Hope you've enjoyed "Poodles: A Look At The World's Smartest Dog Breed."



Friday, September 14, 2018

NORFOLK TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Norfolk Terrier - Dogs of the World



Friday, August 10, 2018

Fact Sheet: APPENZELL MOUNTAIN DOG

(Original Title: Appenzell Mountain Dog)

Appenzeller Sennenhund
Appenzeller Sennenhund (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Breed group: Mastiff
Weight: 49-70 lbs
Height: Males 22-23 inches, females 18-20 inches

Overview
There is not complete agreement on the origin of this breed. The one theory is that the Appenzell Mountain dog is a native breed that dates back to the Bronze Age, and the other is that is descended from the Molossus and the later brought into Switzerland by the Romans. These dogs are one of the four Swiss Sennenhunds, with the Appenzell Mountain dog being the rarest of the four. These dogs make outstanding herd dogs, seeing that they are without a tire in the mountains. The Appenzell are also very flexible when it comes to pulling carts, and they were used to bring cheese and milk to the merchants in town from the valleys. This is a very hard working breed that loves to work with the herd when it is not guarding its master.

Temperament
The Appenzell Mountain dog has a very high intelligence, and they are also very active. They do well with other animals and people, especially when they have been socialized well from an early age onwards. These dogs can, however, be wary of strangers. This is an active breed that will need a lot of exercises. They will flourish with agility and skill training, but also be a bit noisy and get bored easily. This is definitely not an indoor dog. This dog is a tough dog that has sober habits. The Appenzell Mountain dog will be devoted to the whole family, but will probably bond closely with one member.

Care
This breed has a straight-haired double coat that does not require a lot of care. Dead hears can be removed with a rubber brush from time to time to keep their coats in a good condition.


Training
This breed will do best in a consistent and well-balanced training environment. It is important for this dog to be socialized well with different types of situations, animals, and people. Due to the intelligence of these dogs, they will learn very quickly. These dogs like to be given a task to complete. The Appenzell Mountain dog loves to be outdoors, especially when its trainer is close by. This dog will do very well in skills trials and games of catch. The Appenzell can be very noisy, but they are outgoing dogs that make excellent watchdogs. The Appenzell Mountain dog is a very pleasant and warm dog, but prefers the freedom of wide open spaces and therefore not well suited for indoor living.

Health problems
The Appenzell Mountain dog is a very tough and healthy breed that has no breed-specific conditions worth reporting.



Friday, May 25, 2018

Fact Sheet: SAMOYED Dog

(Original Title: Samoyed Dog Breed)


Happy dog
Photo by scottfeldstein

Description.

The Samoyed are medium-sized dogs, with muscular bodies', and a height for the male dog of 21-23° inches which weigh in at 45-65 pounds and the female bitch stand 19-21 inches with a weight of 35-50 pounds. They have a fairly fluffy coat that hides a great deal of their muscular definition. Their deep-set bowman shaped eyes are a dark colour and are set a little on the wide side. With a medium to long tail which they carry rolled on their back. The feet are flat and have an ample covering of hair, with the legs being muscular and solid. But it is a double thickness and very dense the longer hair is set within the thick undercoat and is harsh in feel. Their neck is exaggerated by the hair and appears to form a ruff, which would keep the neck warm in their native climate.

History. 
The Samoyed is a very old breed, even ancient. They were native to Siberia and used by the hunters and fishermen. Some were used as sledge dogs, which doubled up as security by guarding the homes and also used in the herding of reindeer. It was common to these dogs to sleep with people in the household, to keep them warm. The dogs were first taken to England by the famous explorer Robert Scott, in 1889. The breed was further refined in England and started its worldwide spread from there. The breed was first recognized by the AKC in 1906.

Temperament. 
They tend to be a happy-go-lucky friendly dog, with a playful nature. They can become very devoted to their owners. They integrate well with others and unfortunately get on with pretty much anybody, I say unfortunately because this will include anybody who tries to burgle your house. However, all is not lost because their excited barking will alert you to a stranger being near, but it will be up to you to tackle them. As with most dogs training needs to be started as early as possible, and the dogs' master needs to assert themselves over this dog, in a calm friendly but firm manner. They are in themselves a stable breed but do require a lot of exercises both physical and mental. If adequately trained and cared for these dogs are exceptional in their good nature.

Health issues. 
The breed is particularly prone to hip dysplasia and is known to be at risk of diabetes. Along with a predisposition to skin allergies and PRA affecting the eyes, they are overall a fairly healthy breed with a life expectancy of 12 to 15 years.





Grooming. 
You only need to see their coat to realise that they are going to require extensive brushing and combing. As seasonal shedders, they moult very heavily, and brushing and combing of their coat should probably be conducted more frequently during the moulting season. Most commonly though, normal grooming will keep your dog clean so frequent bathing will not be a requirement.

Living conditions. 
Whilst these dogs can adapt to living in an apartment, if they are exercised well, they are quite active indoors and if your space is limited this may be a problem. They do not tolerate hot weather very well, which means you may well have to exercise them more gently in the summer months. They do integrate well with families and can be great with children, just bear in mind their boisterous nature may cause a few tumbles during its play time if he gets too excitable. However, other pets in the house should not be a problem, but it is a good idea to supervise when small animals are available.

    By Scott Allan Lipe
    For more information on different Dog Breeds, Dog Training and Teacup Puppies for sale including Yorkies, Chihuahuas, and Morkies please visit our websites below.

    Samoyed Dog Breed

    Article Source: EzineArticles


Thursday, April 26, 2018

Fact Sheet: BRUSSELS GRIFFON

(BRUSSELS GRIFFON Dog Breed Profile)

English: brussels griffon weights 7 pounds, co...
Brussels Griffon weights
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Description:
There are actually three types of Brussels Griffon: 
Belgian Griffon
Brussels Griffon
Petit Griffon. 
All are considered to be toy dogs with a shoulder height of 7 to 8 inches and a weight of 6 to 12 pounds. The stop of the dog is very pronounced and the muzzle is short. The tail of the Griffon is usually docked and the ears can either be clipped or left natural. The coat of this dog comes in two varieties, smooth and rough. The rough coated Griffon has a wiry, longish coat with distinctive facial hair. The coat of the smooth is short and glossy. The Griffon will generally live to be 12 to 15 years old. This dog is also known as the Petit Brabancon and the Griffon Bruxellois.

History:
The first artistically rendered appearance of the Brussels Griffon is in the painting 'The Arnolfini Wedding' by Jan Van Eyck. This masterpiece was created in 1435 and shows the Griffon looking confidently out of the painting. The Griffon was used as a ratter in stables in its native Belgium and it is thought that the original dog was crossed with the Affenpinscher, the Pug, and the King Charles Spaniel to arrive at the dog with which we are familiar today.

Temperament:
The Brussels Griffon makes an excellent companion dog and is cheerful and confident. It loves to cuddle up with its favorite person and will expect plenty of attention. This small dog sometimes needs to be reminded of its size when trying to dominate dogs much larger than it is. The Brussels Griffon tends to bond strongly with one person and should be considered a one person dog. As such, it is probably not a suitable dog for homes with children, especially small ones. However, the Brussels Griffon does get along well with other household pets.

Health Issues:
As with all short-faced breeds, the Brussels Griffon can suffer from breathing problems. It should also be kept as cool as possible when the weather is hot. This breed can also have problems with their eyes, such as cataracts. The Griffon often experiences trouble with whelping and caesarian sections are often called for.


Grooming:
Although the smooth coated Brussels Griffon does not need more than a weekly brushing to keep the coat in good condition, the rough-coated dog will need rather intensive grooming. The dog should be brushed every day to keep mats and tangles from forming. Some people prefer to clip the rough coat shorter for ease of care. It is sometimes necessary to trim the hair on the hindquarters for sanitary reasons.

Living Conditions:
As the Brussels Griffon is exclusively a companion dog, it belongs in the house or apartment with the human with whom it has bonded. It is quite active and playful indoors and will get much of its exercise in this fashion. The Brussels will appreciate a walk every day, however, and should be given the opportunity to stretch its legs. This dog is unable to live outside and as it can suffer from heat stroke easily, should be kept out of the sun during hot weather.

    For more information on different Dog Breeds, Dog Training and Teacup Puppies for sale including Yorkies, Chihuahuas, and Morkies please visit our websites below.
    Brussels Griffon Puppies - Puppies or Dogs [http://www.puppies-or-dogs.com]
    Article Source: EzineArticles



Sunday, April 8, 2018

Fact Sheet: DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

(Original Title: Dandie Dinmont Terrier - Facts You Must Know Before Adopting
Dandie Dinmont Terrier)

Dandie Dinmont Terrier - GCH King's Mtn. Angelina Ballerina 02
Photo by Petful.com
Breed Description

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small breed with a distinctive top-knot hair on the head of this terrier dog. Primarily bred to go to the ground, this breed is a low-stationed working dog with an arched top line. They are between 8-11 inches tall at the shoulders and weighs from 18-24 pounds at the average.

Coat

The Dandie Dinmont has a coat mixed with rough top coat and silky undercoat, as demonstrated over their heads. The distinctive hairs on their heads are usually kept relatively long and may shroud the eyes if left without trimming for too long. Their coat color comes in silver and black coat, or reddish-yellow color that is commonly called "mustard".

Activity

These dogs need to be walked on a daily basis and will enjoy playing in the park, or any other securely fenced open areas.

Temperament

The breed is fun-loving and affectionate, making them an excellent companion dog. They are determined, lively, and willful, with intelligent and independent nature, bold, yet dignified. They are aloof with strangers, often protective of family and property. They are great with well-behaved kids, and babies, as long as they were reared with them. Dominance varies greatly, as some males may be aggressive with male dogs in their home, while females can be bad-tempered and snappy.

Overview

Also known as the Dandie or the Hindlee Terrier, this is a breed of dog that belongs to the Terrier group. This interesting little breed has a body similar to that of a Dachshund, but they have a wavy and long coat, with puffed white hair on top of their heads.

Care

These dogs require regular brushing. They need professional grooming, as dead hair should be plucked at about once or twice in a year.

Training

These dogs are tricky to train. They require firm, consistent, and fun training sessions to make these puppies interested. They are intelligent but intelligent enough to question the judgment of their trainers. It is therefore imperative to use positive reinforcement as your approach to asserting your stand as the leader of the pack.

Housebreaking is an important part of training for new owners of these puppies. The key is to be around all the time while they are small, and never allowing them access to the areas where they can muddle up around the house.



Crate training is known to be effective for your dog's training as this allows them the opportunity for quiet time in a space where he can make it his territory, as well as a chance for early housetraining owners can work on.

Character

These dogs are generally lively, independent, and affectionate. They are friendly but can be stubborn at times. They are bold, unafraid, but remains dignified, even when playing. They are extremely loyal and can make excellent guard dogs. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is intelligent, playful, and fun especially when given enough attention.




Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Fact Sheet: VIZSLA Dog Breed

(Original Title: Vizsla Dog Breed Profile)


Curious about photography
Photo  by robot-girl 
Description:
The Vizsla is a medium-sized dog. This is a more lightly built dog than the Redbone Coonhound with which it is sometimes mistaken. The Vizsla dog has a shoulder height of 22 to 26. The bitch will be 2 less. The weight of this dog is 40 to 60 pounds depending on sex. The coat of the Vizsla is a rusty reddish color. The tail of the Vizsla is generally docked to about two-thirds of its original length. The Vizsla will generally live for 12 to 15 years. It is also known as the Hungarian Pointer, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointing Dog, and Rovidszoru Magyar Vizsla.

History:
Long, long ago Magyar tribes arrived in what is now Hungary with their hunting dog, the forerunner of the Vizsla. The oldest pictorial reference to the Vizsla is an old stone etching showing the dog with its owner, who also has a falcon for hunting. The Vizsla was first mentioned in writing in 1357. As the aristocracy developed a fondness for this dog, it was also bred in with the Transylvanian Hound and the extinct Turkish Yellow Dog. Down to only about a dozen dogs after World War II, the Vizsla made a comeback thanks to the efforts of dedicated breeders.

Temperament:
The Vizsla is very gentle with the family. It is also a dog that has a very high energy level that needs to be addressed every day. This dog does best with children if it has been given enough exercise, otherwise, it might be too excitable for young children. This is a working dog and thrives on training and the chance to hunt or perform at agility. Not being given enough exercise can be very detrimental to this dog's mental and physical health. The Vizsla can be socialized to get along with other dogs. Unfortunately, the Vizsla can probably never be trusted with small household pets.

Health Issues:
Despite the restricted gene pool from which this dog made a comeback, the Vizsla is surprisingly free of most genetic disorders. This dog can suffer from hip dysplasia and food allergies, however.


Grooming:
The grooming requirements of the Vizsla are minimal. The dog should be brushed once a week to keep the coat free of dead hairs and to distribute the natural oils. This dog does not often need a bath but can be given a dry shampoo instead. As with all dogs with floppy ears, the ears of the Vizsla should be checked regularly to make sure they are clean and dry.

Living Conditions:
The Vizsla will be perfectly happy in the house with its human family, as it craves attention. The Vizsla will not mind being able to sleep on its owner's bed if allowed. This dog is not at its best in an apartment, however, it is quite active inside and with no easy outlet for its energy, it can become highly strung and destructive. Regardless of where it lives, the Vizsla must be given a great deal of exercise every day. It will love a walk of several miles and should have a chance to run off the leash occasionally.




Friday, March 23, 2018

Fact Sheet: GOLDENDOODLE

(Original Title: Goldendoodle - Essential Breed Information)
Goldendoodle Nanuk at 5 months
Goldendoodle Nanuk at 5 months
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today crossing breeds have become a popular option, as people enjoy crossbreeding for the best traits of both breeds. One crossbreed that has only been around for about 20 years happens to be the Goldendoodle. This breed was created around the same time that the Labradoodle was also created and they are very similar breeds. If you're considering the purchase of your own Goldendoodle, here is a look at important breed information you'll need to know.

Origin of the Goldendoodle
First, it's a good idea to learn a bit about the origin of the Goldendoodle. This dog happens to be a Golden Retriever Poodle mix. Some of the other names that are commonly used for this breed include Goldie Poos, Groodles, and Golden Poos. Since some other poodle hybrids that were smaller were very successful, breeders soon decided to try breeding Goldens with a Poodle, making a larger pet that is allergy free. The hybrid turned out wonderfully and this breed quickly became popular.

Hybrid Vigor
The Goldendoodle displays hybrid vigor since they are a first generation cross in most cases today. Basically, this means that since the dogs are the very first cross between two lines of purebreds that are unrelated, they end up growing better and are healthier than both of the parent lines of dogs. This cross has created Goldendoodles that are intelligent, easy to train, friendly, and affectionate. However, as other generations are created, the vigor can be lost.

Breed Description
The parent lines of the Goldendoodle both happen to be water dogs and hunters. When it comes to the physical appearance of the Golden Retriever Poodle mix, they may look like a poodle that curls relaxed or they may even look like a retriever that is very shaggy. However, usually, their look is somewhere between the two. Usually, the length of their fur ends up being between 4-8 inches in length. Their coat color can vary. A few of the colors may include versions of chocolate, black, gold, cream, apricot, phantom, or party. As most of the other poodle crosses, the Goldendoodle usually does not shed much, which means that they are great for families that have allergies that are mild.

About Miniature Goldendoodles
It is possible to find miniature Goldendoodles as well. This occurs when a toy or miniature Poodle is one of the parents. A miniature Goldendoodle will usually be between 15-30 pounds. For those who want smaller dogs, the miniature Golden Retriever Poodle mix is a great option.

Weight and Height of the Breed
When it comes to the weight and the height of the Goldendoodle, it depends on the parentage of the dog. Usually, to get the average weight of adult dogs, you can add the weight of each parent together and then divide it in half. Of course, in every litter that is born, some puppies may end up being heavier or lighter than the weight that is projected. Standard Goldendoodles are usually predicted to be over 45 pounds when they reach adulthood. Miniatures usually are below 30 pounds. However, it is important to note that Goldendoodles in the past have ended up weighing over 100 pounds.

Temperament
One of the wonderful things about the Goldendoodle is their temperament. They are wonderful dogs for families and are both obedient and intelligent. These dogs are devoted to family and are extremely friendly. The Golden Retriever Poodle mix is wonderful with children and very good with other pets too. You'll find that they are happiest when they are around humans. Since they are eager to please, they love to learn, and they are very intelligent, they are extremely easy to train.

Health Issues
If you plan on owning your own Goldendoodle, it's a good idea to know about any possible health issues that may occur. The good news is that since the Goldendoodle is a hybrid cross, they usually will live longer and will be much healthier than the lines of the parents. However, these dogs are prone to the genetic diseases that the Standard Poodle and Golden Retriever deal with. While there are no big health concerns to worry about with the Goldendoodle, a few of the minor concerns to keep in mind include patella, PRA, Elbow, CHD, and VonWillebrand's disorders. It is suggested that these dogs get vWD, eye, and hip tests are done.



Grooming Your Goldendoodle
The Goldendoodle ends up with fur that is usually a combination of poodle and retriever like hair. Fur may reach 4-8 inches in length if it is not clipped. It is important to ensure their fur is combed on a regular basis. If you plan on clipping the Goldendoodle, this should be done several times within every year for the best results.





Sunday, March 18, 2018

Fact Sheet: BLACK MOUTH CUR

Black Mouth Cur - Photo: Pexels

Weight: Male: 55-95, Female: 40-80 lbs
Height: Male: 22-28, Female: 18-26 inches

Overview
The Black Mouth Cur was first bred in the Southern part of the United States. These dogs were intended to be very versatile working dogs. This breed has excellent hunting skills, especially for the hunting of squirrel, raccoon, bear, boar, and mountain lion. The Black Mouth Cur is also used for the herding of cattle, and also as guard dogs. These dogs are primarily working dogs, but they also make fine companions.

Temperament
It is well known that the Black Mouth Cur makes an excellent hunting dog, and many hunters prefer these dogs above any other. Some of their preys include boar, bear, coon, squirrel, and deer. This dog will never back away, and will kill and catch medium-sized game without any hesitation. The Black Mouth Cur is also very capable at treeing and baying and will almost never trot. When hunting, the Black Mouth Cur will either walk or engage in a ground-covering run. These dogs are enthusiastic hunters, but they can also her cattle if needed. Although these dogs are persistent and intense when working, they are very protective and kind toward their families. You will find that they are devoted and without fear, and they love to please their master. The male dogs are particularly loving toward women, but wary toward strange men.

Care
The Black Mouth Cur has short hair, and they are very easy to groom. They can be combed and brushed to remove their dead and loose hairs. These dogs should only be bathed when necessary, as excessive bathing will dry out the skin and will result in skin problems. Their ear canals should also be kept free of hair, and their toenails should be clipped.


Training
This is a breed that is very sensitive and clever. It is recommended that they receive proper obedience and socialization training. This is a dog that will not react well to cruel and unkind training methods. The Black Mouth Cur will do best with training sessions that are diverse and not too long. The training environment for these dogs should also be respectful, fair and consistent. The Black Mouth Cur is very voice sensitive, and a stern voice should be used carefully for the best results to be obtained. This breed should be trained as soon as they arrive at your home. The Black Mouth Cur should not be left alone with other animals.

Health problems
The Black Mouth Cur has no known health issues.


   



Thursday, February 22, 2018

Fact Sheet: BERGER PICARD

Purdy, Berger Picard
Berger Picard - Photo  by Lil Shepherd 
Breed group: Herding
Weight: Male: 60-70; Female: 50-60 lbs
Height: Male: 23.5-25.5; Female: 21.5-23.5 inches

Overview
The Berger Picard is perhaps the oldest of all the French shepherd dogs. This breed arrived in Picardy in AD 800. These dogs have been named after the Picardie region in north-eastern part of France. Some experts believe this breed is connected to the more popular Briard and Beauceron. Other believe they share their origin with the Dutch and Belgian Shepherd dogs. The Berger Picard appeared at the initial French dog show in 1863, but the breed's appearance did not lead to popularity as a show dog. After the two World Wars, this breed was almost extinct and is still very rare. There about 3000 of these dogs in France, and about 350 in Germany.

Temperament
It is advised that you should have some previous dog ownership experience before getting one of these dogs. The Berger Picard has a very sensitive and self-assured nature. You will find that these dogs are also extremely loyal and calm. They get along well with children, dogs, and other animals - especially if they have been raised with them. The Berger Picard is a very diligent, lively and alert dog. The Berger Picard will however not do well if they are cut off or uncared for - and this might lead to destructive behavior. This breed will do very well guardian of their families, livestock and their territories.

Care
The coat of the Berger Picard should only be combed or brushed two times a month, especially when they are shedding during spring and autumn. The fur of these dogs should not be washed or trimmed. It can be cleaned off when dirty. This is a very light shedding breed, and they also have no doggie smell.


Training
This breed is extremely intelligent, and also very quick to learn. The Berger Picard breed will need to be socialized and trained in obedience from very early on. These dogs also have a very stubborn streak, and can also be very temperamental. It is advised that their training sessions are short and diverse to avoid boredom. This is a breed that will not respond positively to cruel or unkind training methods. Training should be done in a patient, fair and firm manner.

Health problems
Some of the Berger Picard's suffer from hip dysplasia, but it is not very common as these dogs are not very heavy. Some of the puppies will also get eye infections because of wind and dirt that gets into their eyes. When older than one year, they will not struggle with this anymore. They also suffer from some genetic eye problems such as the PRA and RD.