Showing posts with label Dog Adoption. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dog Adoption. Show all posts

Monday, June 19, 2017

A DOG Is For Life Not Just For Christmas

My family run an animal sanctuary in Birmingham, England. Even though we love what we do, we feel that some people need to realise that a pet should be a long term commitment. They should not be seen as just a bit of fun which they can then get rid of when they get bored.

Puppy in dog carrier
Puppy in dog carrier
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

Many people arrive at the animal sanctuary with their pets, which are mainly dogs, with many excuses as to why they are no longer able to look after or care for them. I am sure many of their reasons are valid but am also aware that many others are just an excuse to offload them.

The excuses they give are varied:

I have recently divorced from my husband and can no longer afford to keep this dog as a pet

The dog has started to bite my children

The dog is too difficult to handle and is destroying my furniture

We have recently moved into a flat. One of their rules is that no animals can live in these flats

The dog barks to much and it is upsetting the neighbours

Our other animals do not like the dog

The dog is affecting my health

I am too ill to look after my dog

It is not our role to question these reasons but what we then need to do is to find another suitable home for the dogs. This is easier said than done as we need to ensure that the new owners will be able to care for them, for hopefully the duration of their life.

We also keep many of the dogs as our own pets, especially the ones which nobody else seems to want. One such dog is called Cassie. She is full of life and has been ill treated it seems when she was a puppy. Half of her left ear is missing and she is seemingly quite afraid of men.

Cassie is need of a huge amount of care and attention. She can be too lively at times which is possibly why three people who attempted to re-home her, have bought her back. She is not aggressive in any way but does tend to jump up at people.

What we did with Cassie and what we will continue to do, is to give her lots of love but also a little bit of training of what is good and what is not acceptable. It takes a long time, but she is now able to understand that the jumping is not wanted and that she needs to chill out at times.

Cassie is turning into a wonderful dog to have around the house and now feels for the first time as part of a family.

With a little more patience most other dogs can turn out this way. This is why we want more people to take more responsibility and to give their animals more of a chance to settle into their homes, and to get used to a new set of rules.



Having animals as pets can be very rewarding, nearly as rewarding as having a child. A dog however will rarely answer you back.

If you are having problems with your animals you can always phone up animal sanctuaries for advice and to hear about possible solutions. The people who work there are animal lovers and will help you as much as they can.

If you are unable to continue looking after the pet, the sanctuary should be able to take them off you.



Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Adopting A PROTECTION DOG

Mackie writes:

My good friend who is a dog trainer offered me his 5 year old Belgian Malinois for adoption. He is trained as a protection dog so he can guard his master, bite on command, release the bite on command, stay until released and others. He has a trophy as third placer in Level 1 protection in a protection dog competition. I have two dogs at present: A one year-old and a nine month-old Labrador... both are females, obedience trained and not neutered.


Two Belgian Malinois playing in snow in Ohio.
Two Belgian Malinois playing in snow in Ohio. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
I would like to adopt him and I know I can take care of him. Will he accept me after being my friend's favorite dog for 5 years? My friend assured me that he can transfer the loyalty of the dog to me. He is a fierce dog when in competition but a very quiet dog when outside the training ring. In fact my friend brings the dog with him all the time and I know of several occasions that the dog is off leash. He is giving him up because he wants to replace him with a younger dog.

Should I take him up on his offer?

Dear Mackie:

Yes... the dog will transfer his loyalty to you.

Here are two major issues you should consider before adopting this dog:

1. The Belgian Malinois (especially one that is bred and trained for bite work and protection dog sports) will require a lot of work ON YOUR PART to learn how to handle this dog. You're going to need a lot of training... one-on-one style... to successfully integrate this dog into your life. It's like driving a Ferrari or a race car. The car already runs great, but if you don't learn the right way to drive it, you'll end up killing yourself. And just because you already know how to drive a Subaru doesn't cut it... we're talking Ferrari, here. And the Belgian Malinois is a Ferrari with the tricked out Turbo engine.

2. The breed is an extremely HIGH DRIVE breed. This dog needs TONS of exercise and mental stimulation. TONS. Please take the time to recognize that adopting this dog will be a major responsibility.



If you decide to do it, and you are successful, you'll have an amazing companion. The breed is quite healthy and you can be content in knowing that you own a KING OF KINGS as far as working dogs are concerned.

Part of me has always wanted what you're thinking about getting. But my lifestyle and dedication to the exercise and training requirements are something I do not have at this current point in my life.

P.S. Make sure that the dog isn't dog aggressive before you decide to take ownership.


Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Learn About MILITARY DOG Adoption

Military dogs are no ordinary dogs; they are not the regular dog breeds that one is used to at any given moment. They usually are highly trained dogs that are used in combat. Their functions vary from carrying equipment to first line attack; some are even used as spies as they can detect the enemy from a far without causing any suspicion. These traits make the military dog adoption a very suitable companion for military personnel nut when their time comes to be laid off service what next for them?

WORKING DOG — U.S. Air Force military working ...
WORKING DOG (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As initially mentioned the military that we know is some protocol and order and in this case once the dogs are done with their service, there is some protocol to be followed in the case of adoption of these dogs. They are put up for these programs within the force and if none is interested in these dogs then they usually are put up for these services to other government institutes and if by any chance there are still some dogs left then they are set up for adoption to the ex-service men as they have the skill of handling them and finally the general public may take up the last dogs.

Before a military dog is put up for this, a number of factors are considered before its released to the public. One of the main factors in place is the level of aggression on the dog. Highly aggressive dogs are rarely placed for these services because in many cases they cause more harm than good to the general public. In many instances they are way laid as they usually are not suitable for the general public.

The level of dependency also determines the release of a dog for adoption. The highly dependent dogs are more likely to be killed or remain in service as they may be trouble for the handlers. The very skilled dogs are also highly dependent as they need constant commands from the owners and the other injured dogs also need constant supervision.

The breed of the dog also highly determines at what age and level they will be put up for adoption, in some cases some dogs are put up for earlier in this program than others due to their expected lifespan. The breed and species dictates how the dog fairs on with life as after a certain period of living it becomes more of a burden than an advantage.



Some combat dogs are adopted at a very early in their life. Not because they do not suite the job but because of their intelligence intelligence. They portrayed high level of intelligence and in most cases they are put aside for adoption solely for breeding purposes as this line of genes should be passed on to the future generations.

Many of the dogs that are ex-military still have not fully lived their expected life span as they were intended to thus putting them up for adoption gives them a second chance to life and by nature the loyal nature of these dogs makes them very suitable partners as they are used to following commands as one should only know what triggers their reactions.

Adoption is an option that almost all dogs in the forces should be given since they all get that new start away from their norms of life. As a result they also help in saving the lives of many.


    About the Author: Daphne Bowen