Showing posts with label Cairn Terrier. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cairn Terrier. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Fact Sheet: CAIRN TERRIER

(Original title: The Playful and Inquisitive Dog: Cairn Terrier)

The Cairn is assumed as one of the subcategories of Scotland’s terriers along with the Westies (West Highland White) and the Scottish, The Westies and the Cairns are highly related. For one, Westies are hybrids of white dogs crossed with Cairns of western Scotland. The Westie can be considered as the white variety of the Cairn who has a coat of any color but white. Scotties, however, have longer heads and bodies, have generally dark coats and are aloof than the other two. These dogs originated from the short-haired Skyes.

Cairn is the smallest breed among the terrier group. The name Cairn was coined after the small stone piles that marked borders of Scottish farms and graves.  During the early times, this breed was used to guide small animals into these piles of stones. However, Cairns are strong and sturdy but are not heavy.  

This dog was already present during the 1500s even before it became popular in 1930, after the appearance of “Toto” in “The Wizard of Oz” as Dorothy’s companion dog. Presently, like the American pit bull terriers, Cairns are used as companion dogs. Among the variety’s talents are tracking, watching over the house, hunting, and performing tricks and sports regarding competitive obedience.    

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Cairns:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: indoors (highly recommended); outdoors (fenced yard) 

Coat: shaggy and coarse outer coat and short and soft furry undercoat

Colors: any color except white

Height: between 9.5 and 10 inches

Weight: between 13 and 14 pounds 

Temperament: like most terriers that were bred as hunters, these dogs are mischievous, alert, restless and high-spirited; also have a special connection with children age six and above 

Breeders should note the following health issues: 

 Atopy, a type of allergy 
 Cataract, or loss of transparency of one or both lenses of the eyes 
 Cryptorchidism, wherein testicles do not descend into the scrotum
 Glaucoma, a condition that causes an increased pressure within the eye
 Patellar luxation, a disorder in the kneecap

Care and Exercise: 

Daily brushing is recommended to prevent tangles and mats.
Hair around ears and eyes must be trimmed regularly.
Do not overfeed them as they gain weight easily.
Their physique requires a regular exercise routine which includes a daily play time while on a leash.
They should be on a leash while walking in public places because of their hunting instincts. 

Origin/History:

As already noted, the Cairns were existent since around the 1500s. At around 1700s, the Isle of Skye and other highlands in Scotland were already producing lots of small terriers. Scottish breeds were separated into two: the Skye terriers and the Dandie Dinmont terriers. 

The Dandie Dinmonts were categorized as a separate breed. The Skyes included the Scotties, the Westies, and the Cairns.



In the year 1912, the Cairns receive their official name based on their excellent ability to hunt down vermin such as otters, foxes, and badgers that were hiding in Cairns.  However, it was in the year 1913 when they received the official recognition from the American Kennel Club. 

The Cairn terrier is one heck of an agile little dog that is very appropriate for the whole family. This breed is playful, prying, and is always ready to join the fun. If you are still not convinced, just reckon how Dorothy was entertained and accompanied by this type of dog.




Friday, July 7, 2017

Diamond In The Ruff -- Meet The CAIRN TERRIER

The Cairn terrier hails from Scotland, as do its close and outstanding relatives, the Scottish terrier and the West Highland terrier. Much like another cousin, the Welsh terrier, the Cairn is probably an underappreciated breed in the United States, while it remains wildly popular in the old country. But its relative dark horse status is likely just fine with serious Cairn fans.

Deutsch: Cairn Terrier Nimbu und Pongo aus der...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Unlike several fancier strains of terrier, the Cairn has never been subjected to uptown clips and beauteous barbering, like the Kerry or the Wire terrier. As a result, the Cairn can look pretty shaggy in comparison, and resembles the working dog he was born and bred to be. Cairns, after all, were named after the cairns or piled stones in the Scottish Highlands they so often set themselves to digging through, looking for rats. The Cairn was a fearless hunter of vermin and rouster of foxes, with strong claws, teeth, and an absolutely nonnegotiable hunting instinct. He is not the type of dog you can set loose in the park.

The Cairn terrier is a convenient size for most modern families, weighing only about 13 or 14 pounds. He is tough and resilient, and has a genuine liking for children, although you'll still need to make sure that they treat him gently, like any other dog. The Cairn is a cheerfully independent type with an incredibly sharp brain. You'll want to give him some interesting jobs around the house and make sure he stays as challenged as possible (otherwise, he’s likely to challenge your flower beds). Even though many modern small dogs essentially end up as lapdogs, the Cairn has the smarts and the perseverance to be much more.





Despite his shaggy locks, some terrier lovers find a unique and rustic beauty in this breed. If you want an active, enthusiastic, tough little terrier companion, the Cairn deserves your serious consideration.

Cairns come in almost all colors -- anything but white conforms to type. Anyone wanting to add a small, sharp and very affectionate dog to their family unit would do well to consider the long-lived Cairn.



Saturday, July 2, 2016

Some Information Regarding CAIRN TERRIER Pet Dogs

If you are thinking of getting a Cairn terrier pet dog, then you need to know some information about it first. Why? Well, knowing the right information about anything will help you in the long run. This is especially true when we are talking about a pet ownership. Before you get a Cairn terrier pet dog, you need to be sure that you know what you are getting yourself into. You need to know how to take proper care of your cairn terrier pet dog and you also need to know what to expect when you are getting one.

Cairn-Terrier
Cairn-Terrier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Thankfully, there are a lot of sites on the internet which can provide you the necessary information. To save you some time, however, here are the basics:

Originally bred in the Scottish highlands, the Cairn terrier is the smallest of all terrier breeds. You should not let the size deceive you when you are getting a Cairn terrier pet dog, however. The Cairn terrier was first bred because of its working ability. You know what this means? This means energy.

A Cairn terrier pet dog has a lot of energy to spare. They can gain a lot from taking brisk walks daily. However, you should know that they do best when they have a fenced-in yard to play in. This way, they get more room when they play. Their high energy also means that they aren’t really suitable for apartment or condo living. If you live in such places, then having a Cairn terrier pet dog is not for you.

Their energy may also put them in danger. This is the reason why you need to make sure that a Cairn terrier pet dog stays in one area. Their natural instincts tell them to dig and run and these activities may lead to accidents if unsupervised.

There are, however, a lot of positive things that can be said about a Cairn terrier pet dog’s energy. For one thing, it makes the dog fun to play with. It can play for hours on end, giving you the companionship that you want. Another positive with this energy is the fact that this energy can be channeled into good purposes. A Cairn terrier pet dog is naturally inquisitive and is always willing to participate in a new adventure. This means that a Cairn terrier pet dog can be easily taught to do tricks. They learn tricks very fast and thrive in obedience training.

You need to make sure that your Cairn terrier pet dog is trained properly since untrained ones have a tendency to be destructive when they are bored.


Let us talk about the proper care for a Cairn terrier pet dog. One thing you do not need to worry about is its coat. The Cairn terrier pet dog was not bred for the beauty of its coat. The coat of a Cairn terrier pet dog is weather resistant and sheds little to no fur. Because of this, it can be a great indoor pet.

Being the smallest of terrier breeds, however, makes Cairn terrier pet dogs especially vulnerable to various health problems. Care must be taken when feeding it as it can gain weight quite rapidly. A Cairn terrier pet dog is also especially sensitive to fleas. However, you can be sure that this is one of the best breeds around.



Friday, July 1, 2016

CAIRN TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Cairn Terrier - Dogs of the World