Monday, June 25, 2018

PEKINGESE - Dogs of the World

Pekingese - Dogs of the World



Saturday, June 23, 2018

The Cruelty Of CLAW REMOVAL

Cat Claw
Cats use their claws for various purposes.  The claws are important to cats, as they are an essential part of balancing.  If you’ve ever noticed a cat jumping and latching on to a high object, you’ve probably noticed that he uses his claws to pull himself up.  When climbing trees, cats tend to use their claws to latch onto the bark and climb towards their destination. 

Cats also use their claws for stretching, walking, and running as well.  The claws are also a cat’s primary source of defense against other animals and humans as well.  Most cats keep their claws extremely sharp, as their claws and teeth are basically their only weapons.  The claws are also essential for using the bathroom as well, as cats use them to cover up their mess with dirt.

Cats also use their claws to scratch things, which mark their territory.  Their claws have glands, which contain a secretion.  When they leave their mark on something, the secretion is transferred to the area they scratched.  This is detectable to other cats although not to humans.  Sometimes, they will also scratch something to remove the older claw which will fall off and give them a brand new claw that resides underneath.

As sad as it is, a lot of pet owners choose to put their own possessions above their cats, such as their expensive furniture or carpets.  These cat owners are afraid that they cat will ruin their furniture or carpet, and therefore will choose to get their cat de-clawed.  Getting a cat’s claws removed is a surgical procedure, one that can only be performed by a veterinarian.  The owner will need a good reason though, as a vet won’t do the surgery just to keep one’s furniture or carpet protected.

If you’ve been thinking of getting your cat de-clawed, you should know that the process can totally change his personality.  Once the cat is de-clawed, he will be in pain and confused.  He may not be able to jump in the window or on the couch, and he may not be able to play like he once did.  Some cats, after being de-clawed, tend to get aggressive and bite with their teeth.  To make a long story short, the cat will be completely miserable – which is a tough thing to bear for those who love their cats.

Those who decide to own cats should know that a cat can scratch on occasion.  If someone isn’t prepared to deal with that fact, they shouldn’t own a cat in the first place.  Cats are great pets, although they do have claws and they will use them on occasion.  There are plenty of other great pets out there if you aren’t up for handling a cat.  If you’re just worried about your furniture or carpet, there are ways that you can keep your cat from scratching on your belongings.

The first thing to do is to get your cat a scratching post and let him know where it is and how to use it.  You can also get a rush mat as well, which will help your cat with his instincts to scratch.  You may have to demonstrate how to use the mat or the post at first, although your cat should catch onto it quick.  Once you have shown him the ropes, he will scratch on the post or the mat – and not your furniture or your carpet.


Although many don’t realize it, there are other ways to protect your things other than getting your cat de-clawed.  Getting a cat’s claws removed is very painful and confusing to the cat, and may totally change his outlook on things.  Before you decide to take the inhumane path of getting your cat de-clawed, you should look into your other available options- your cat will like these options much better.



Friday, June 22, 2018

What Should You Know About Caring for Your Little PEKINGESE Puppy?

A pekingese puppy, 8 months old
A Pekingese puppy, 8 months old (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
If you are considering buying a Pekingese puppy, there are a few things you should know about the breed. This ancient Chinese breed is an ideal companion dog. They weren't bred to hunt or retrieve so if you are looking for a lap dog that is also alert and playful; the Pekingese is a perfect choice.

A new Pekingese Puppy -
The Pekingese puppies are adorable - cute and cuddly. These dogs will snore, shed hair and wheeze. So only buy a Pekingese puppy if you live in a cooler climate and have time at hand to be able to groom your dog regularly. A chunky and sturdy puppy, the Pekingese is appealing and mild tempered. But that doesn't mean the dog will be easy to maintain! A Pekinese can get a horde of physical ailments, ranging from eye infections to skin infections. Also, these dogs are more prone to disc injuries, allergies, and joint problems. A new puppy will be inquisitive by nature and will require a lot of training.

Training a Pekinese puppy -
Like all puppies, the Pekingese is also playful and active. But unlike a Labrador retriever or a German shepherd, the Pekingese puppy will not live to please you. If you want an obedient dog with no behavioral issues, you will have to earn the respect of this cute little puppy. You will need to train this puppy consistently, with a firm hand so that the dog understands that you are the master, and only you call the shots. Being relaxed about the training of a Pekingese means you will suffer from an aggressive and ill-tempered dog for the next 13 years of your life. Doesn't sound too good, does it? So be firm and be consistent, because this small breed is known for its stubbornness and may need a little more time and patience to be housebroken and trained for basic obedience. However, that doesn't mean you give up too soon. It is absolutely essential for your safety as well as the safety of your Pekingese puppy that he learns simple obedience commands like - Sit, Stay, No, Come and Heel sooner rather than later.


Pekinese grooming-
Like any other dog with a thick coat, the Pekingese puppy will need regular grooming. Some puppies resist grooming, and it is your job as the master to train your puppy to sit still while you comb his coat. Make sure you do it more often - maybe twice a day so that the/ puppy gets comfortable with you detangling his coat. Also, you will need to take special care of this breed's eyes and paws, so make sure your puppy is trained from an early age to sit peacefully while you examine the fur and paws for skin infections or the eyes for dryness.



Thursday, June 21, 2018

BORDER COLLIE - The Facts Every Owner of this Dog Breed Should Know

Border Collie - Photo: Pixabay
Bred for their intelligence and herding instincts, Border Collies are descended from British herding dogs. A medium sized dog, Border Collies will grow to about 19 to 22 inches and 30 to 45 pounds. They will live about 12 to 15 years. Border Collies have medium to long hair that comes in a variety of colors and is prone to shedding. Border Collies need to be brushed regularly to keep the coat healthy and dirt free. Border Collies are also known for their stare. Though their eyes can be brown, amber or blue, it is the Border Collie stare that people remember. This is part of the herding instinct, and a Border Collie will attempt to herd almost anything, including cars and children.

Great care must be taken with a Border Collie to ensure it does not hurt itself or others. A fenced in yard and plenty of leash training is a must with this breed. Border Collies are easy to train due to their intelligence, but, because of their desire to work, Border Collies must have work to do. If they are not given tasks to perform and room to roam, they will become bored and destructive.

They must have a lot of stimulation and activity to stay happy. Though good with children, Border Collies may attempt to herd them and, to keep the 'herd' in line, Border Collies have been known to nip. Border Collies usually do not do well with other animals, due to their herding instinct, and can become aggressive with other dogs of the same gender. Border Collies can be excellent household pets but must be cared for by a family willing to give them the training, attention, care, and activities they need. Border Collies are not recommended for people who live in apartments or those who do not plan on spending a lot of time with their pet.


Border Collies do have some breed specific issues. Some are prone to hip dysplasia, PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) and Collie Eye Anomaly. Many Border Collies are allergic to fleas and some are prone to epilepsy and deafness. Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) is a shoulder lameness that can develop between the ages of 4 to 12 months. Border Collies have also been known to work themselves to exhaustion and suffer from heat stroke in the hot weather.

Because Border Collies are very physically active, they are prone to athletic injuries, such as pulled muscles, cruciate ligament ruptures, cuts, and punctures, ripped toenails and footpads.



Wednesday, June 20, 2018

4 Things to Think About Before DECLAWING your CAT

English: The right front paw of Jyou, a tuxedo...
The right front paw of Jyou, a tuxedo cat from Brentwood, Tennessee. Jyou was declawed on the instructions of the photographer, Allison Stillwell. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Declawing is a major surgery known as onychectomy, performed under anesthesia, that removes the tip of each digit (from the first knuckle out) of the cat's forepaws. There is a slight chance of death in the surgery, and a declawed cat may have an increased risk of infection and life-long discomfort in its paws. This surgery is not recommended for an adult animal and is considered an act of animal cruelty in some countries (see below).

People generally have cats declawed to prevent them from hunting and from damaging furniture. Rarely, vicious cats are declawed. In the United States, some landlords require that tenants' cats be declawed.

Veterinarians are generally critical of the procedure and some refuse to perform it because of the absence of claws in a cat:

1. Deprives it of its main defense abilities, including escaping from predators by climbing trees;
2. Impairs its stretching and exercise habits, leading to muscle atrophy;
3. Compromises its ability to balance on thin surfaces such as railings and fence tops, leading to injury from falls;
4. Can cause insecurity and a subsequent tendency to bite.

This operation is rare outside of North America. In Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, declawing is forbidden by the laws against cruelty to animals. In many other European countries, it is forbidden under the terms of the European Convention for the Protection of Pet Animals, unless "a veterinarian considers [such] non-curative procedures necessary either for veterinary medical reasons or for the benefit of (the) animal".  In Britain, animal shelters find it difficult to place imported cats that have been declawed and subsequently most are euthanized.


An alternative to declawing is the application of blunt, vinyl nail caps that are affixed to the claws with nontoxic glue, requiring periodic replacement when the cat sheds its claw sheaths (about every four to six weeks). However, the cat will still experience difficulties because the capped nails are not as effective as claws.