Tuesday, October 23, 2018

How To Start TRAINING PUPPIES

English: Chihuahua puppy
Chihuahua puppy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Training puppies too early can be difficult. But, if you do not train him early, he will very quickly have the run of the house.

Training puppies are necessary because it saves you trouble later. Most dog owners skip this because we all know that dog training takes some effort. If you could teach a puppy in a month, you would be happy. But training a dog well is a longer task. Just because your dog looks cute as a puppy do not let this deter you from training him early.

In training puppies, there are some do’s and don’ts. 

Do

Provide the puppy with consistent access to the toilet area. If you are training your puppy at home take him to his toilet area every 45 minutes or so. If you are not at home make sure you help your puppy make a few ‘mistakes’ as possible, by giving him a puppy friendly environment. 

Every time your puppy does something ‘good’, give him a reward. If he eliminates his waste in the toilet area, praise him and give him a treat. He will then recognize that his actions were right and aim for more because of the reward he will get. Make sure your rewards immediately follow the good action.

Feed your puppy just like you feed yourself. If you eat regularly, set aside food for him. It is important to train your puppy the right time to eat. This will prevent him from begging for food from your plates.

Be patient in training your puppies. Relapses will take place, but patience and perseverance are key. Remember your dog wants nothing more than to please you. After he is fully trained and it will be worth the while. 

Don’t

Shout at your puppy when he makes mistakes. Especially when dogs are young as this can cause frights that can stay with the dog as it gets older.

When house training your dog, don’t leave water and food out all the time. If he drinks a lot, he will urinate more frequently. You will have to allow for more mistakes to be made.

Always watch the actions of your puppy and reinforce the good behavior many times throughout the day. It is not proper to let him run around as if he owns the house. If he does so, he will carry that attitude until he grows up.

Remembering some of these simple tips can make your puppy a better-trained dog and a more enjoyable pet.



Monday, October 22, 2018

JACK RUSSEL TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Jack Russel Terrier - Dogs of the World



Saturday, October 20, 2018

JACK RUSSEL TERRIER - The facts every owner of this dog breed should know

English: A Jack Russell Terrier wearing a blue...
A Jack Russell Terrier wearing a blue harness. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Originally bred in the 19th century by Parson Jack Russell, an avid hunter, selected traits that would assist him in hunting. Working dogs, Jack Russell Terriers were bred to be fearless and feisty to flush out prey from the forest, particular foxes. As a working dog, Jack Russell Terriers tend to have an athletic build and boundless energy. Jack Russell Terriers are very intelligent, but also willful and stubborn, which can make them extremely difficult to train without consistency.

As a hunting and working dog, Jack Russell Terriers do have the hunting instinct in them and have been knowing to consider smaller household pets prey. However, this does not mean that they cannot be good family pets. Jack Russell Terriers are usually very good with children and gentle with them if they understand how to approach dogs. Jack Russell Terriers live 15 years or more. They grow to an average of 10 to 12 inches in height and 14 to 18 pounds in weight. Jack Russell Terriers have several different types of coats of the shorthaired variety (some are smooth, some are not) but all are easy to maintain with regular brushing.

Jack Russell Terriers are suited for all kinds of living but do need to be exercised regularly, at least once a day, due to their seemingly boundless energy. Without regular opportunities to exercise and play, they will become bored and begin to bark at everything and become destructive. If a Jack Russell Terrier must be left alone for an extended period of time without the opportunity to exercise, it is recommended that they are crated until it is possible to let them exercise.

Jack Russell Terriers are fearless and will run off without thinking. A fenced in area is a must for a Jack Russell Terrier, but the fence needs to be deep enough as they are diggers, and tall enough to not jump over. An average sized Jack Russell Terrier can jump five feet quite easily. There are some health concerns with the breed. Some Jack Russell Terriers are prone to dislocation of the kneecaps, inherited eye diseases, deafness, Legg Perthes - a disease of the hip joints, and cataracts. Currently, there is some dispute about the breed and breed standards. The AKC does not officially recognize the Jack Russell Terrier, considered a working dog. It only officially recognizes the Parson Russell Terrier.

    By Robert W. Benjamin - Copyright © 2007


Friday, October 19, 2018

KITTEN VACCINATIONS: Types of Vaccinations

Feline viral rhinotracheitis infection
Feline viral rhinotracheitis infection (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
In recent years, the vaccination of cats has become more popular. The three most common vaccines give protection against feline infectious enteritis (FIE), feline influenza (cat flu) and feline leukemia (FeLV). An initial course of two injections, the first at nine weeks are usually given, and yearly boosters are recommended thereafter.

FIE causes vomiting and diarrhea, and the cat develops a very high temperature. Before the vaccine was introduced, it killed a great many cats by dehydration due to the bowel symptoms. Cat flu is caused by two viruses: the feline rhinotracheitis (FCV). FVR is the more severe of the two, causing coughing, sneezing, and nasal and eye discharges.

FVC has milder discharges but more gum inflammation and mouth ulcers. Neither FCV nor FVR is usually deadly but the infection can linger on in the form of snuffles, and some cats become symptomless carriers of the disease. When stressed, these cats develop mild symptoms and spread the virus.

FeLV suppresses the activity of the cat's immune system, allowing a wide range of symptoms to develop. It often results in the death of the cat after several months of illness. The virus is spread mainly in the cat's saliva. It is a disease of cats that fight a lot, and of cats in large colonies, who share the same food and water bowls. It should not be a threat in a well-run boarding cattery, where the feeding and grooming utensils are properly cleaned, and the cats do not mix with each other.

A vaccine exists against the chlamydial organism, which can cause not only mild eye and nasal symptoms, but more importantly, infertility and abortion. This vaccine is used mainly in breeding colonies to protect against infertility.



Thursday, October 18, 2018

BONES for Your Dog - Delicious Treat or A Deadly Snack?

Photo: Pixabay
There is a difference of opinion among canine experts as to whether bones should be given to a dog raw, cooked, hard, or soft, and even whether they should be given at all. On one point, however, there is total agreement, never give a dog splintering bones from chicken, pork, fowl, and rabbit, (although chicken bones that have been cooked in a pressure cooker until they are very soft can be quite nourishing and safe).

A marrow bone is the traditional symbol of a treat for a dog, and he obviously appreciates it. It may be too big and hard for small dogs. In fact, large breeds generally handle bones much better than small ones. Bones that are mostly cartilage, such as spinal and shoulder bones of veal, knuckle bones, and soft rib bones, are good chewing material that can be entirely consumed.

The real danger is intestinal compaction, especially in small dogs, if the masticated bone has not been mixed with another residue in the dog's stomach. A small amount should cause no trouble if it is given right after a meal. Chop and steak bones are more dangerous. Careful eaters simply clean off the meat and fat, but greedy gobblers run the risk of internal injury from jagged bone splinters. The same is true of a leg of lamb bone.

What is the best policy to follow with a dog of your own? A teething puppy between four and six months of age should always have a bone, real or imitation, to chew on. You might give an adult dog a suitable bone as an occasional treat - for example, once a week. It will give him enormous pleasure, will help to keep his teeth clean and free from tartar, and will occupy him for several hours. But a nylon bone offers the same advantages without the risk!