Monday, April 23, 2018

Retirement: Health for your AGING CAT

Cat noding off; male, neutered, at least 18 ye...
Cat nodding off; male, neutered, at least 18 years of age (died in 2008)
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Age is just a number, right? A Human who is 60 years old may act like a young adult, while another human the same age may at like he or she is on a deathbed. Cats are the same way! Your pet may act like a kitten for many years or maybe gray and achy quite young. Specific breed, environment, and genetics play a role, but in general, a well-cared for house cat usually lives to be at least 15 years old. Some cats live to be well over 30.

There are things you can do, however, to provide your cat with the chance for the longest life possible. For example, have your cat spayed or neutered. Statistics show that fixed cats live longer because this causes the cat to stay closer to home and be exposed to few dangerous situations and disease. Good nutrition is also important. Make sure that you are buying cat food that is appropriate for your cat's age.

As your cat ages, certain medical conditions may cause you to make special considerations for your cat. Examples include reduced tolerance to extreme temperatures, decreased sensory perception, susceptibility to infection, arthritis and joint stiffness, digestion problems, liver and kidney problems, weaker bones, cancer, muscle weakness, slow reaction, memory loss, high blood pressure, and irritability. As you can see, aging cats have many of the same problems as aging humans!

Along with a good diet, promote healthy amounts to exercise in your cat. You can do this by allowing your cat to go outside and by playing with your cat every day. Toys and environmental pieces, like scratching posts, are great for encouraging your cat to exercise. Remember, cats may spend a lot of the day sleeping, which is fine. If you are overly concerned, talk to your vet about your cat's sleeping habits.



Preventative health care is, of course, important. Make sure that your cat has regular checkups with the vet to make sure everything is in check. You should also brush your cat's teeth daily and have your cat groomed regularly to prevent skin diseases. As cats age, most grow to love grooming. Monitor your cat for diet changes, changing sleep habits, and unsafe water consumption. The key to graceful aging in a cat is an owner who is well involved in his or her life. Make sure that you provide advanced care for your cat as he or she grows, and your pet should be a part of your life for a very long time.


Sunday, April 22, 2018

AUSTRALIAN TERRIER - Puppies of the World

Australien Terrier - Puppies of the World



Friday, April 20, 2018

How To Master DOG OBEDIENCE

Photo: Pixabay
Dogs are no doubt man's best friends. They are definitely fun to be with and make great companions. Sometimes, they are even considered as part of the family. It certainly feels great to be walking with a dog around either just within the neighborhood or along the beach. But if you happen to have a dog as worse as Marley, the dog in the movie "Marley and Me", perhaps you're more stressed than the usual because of your dog's naughtiness. But why live up with a dog like Marley if you can turn your pet into a well-trained dog? The solution –master dog obedience. Here are some steps on how to do it:

First, be considerate. You have to remember that a dog is an animal, so unlike humans, it has a shorter attention span. You may be able to get its attention now, but a couple of minutes or so it will go back to what it finds interesting. So, try to put yourself into its situation and imagine how frustrating it could be to undergo a dog obedience class instead of doing more fun activities. Take note that most animals are trained easily when given treats before the training. So, before you enroll your pet in a dog obedience class, prepare some really good treats as rewards. 

Next, be consistent. It is not good to give your pet so many instructions at the same time or worse, give up on teaching it a trick just because it is not able to get it at first. Try to be very consistent in such a way that you will start with the easiest command first like the "sit" command before going for more difficult ones. Once it learned the "sit" command, proceed to others like the "stay" or "come" command.

When giving instructions, make sure that you repeat them from time to time until your dog realizes and understands what you are trying to communicate. Again, do not give too many instructions at once for this will confuse your pet more. Take your time. Now, once your pet learned the trick that you've been teaching, give a reward or treat and make sure that you review the trick before jumping into another.

And lastly, of course, be the boss. It is important that your pet recognizes you as its leader; otherwise, you'll end up having a dog that is as hardheaded as Marley. Once your pet recognizes you as the boss, it will be easier for you to make it follow your commands. However, you have to remember that being the boss does not necessarily mean that you have to be harsh to your dog whenever it fails to follow your instructions. Be gentle as possible because this is the most effective way to gain dog obedience.

Mastering dog obedience is not as difficult as you think, right? With all these steps in mind, you are off to a successful dog obedience training. Remember: be considerate, be consistent, and be the boss.


Thursday, April 19, 2018

AUSTRALIAN TERRIERS Make Loyal Pets


The Australian Terrier is one of the smallest of the terrier dog group. It was originally bred in Australia around 1885 as a working dog to guard mines and to tend sheep. The Australian Terrier is a healthy and hardy breed. They are long-living to 15 years or more and free of any major hereditary defects.

They have a rough-textured straight coat 2in. to 3in. long with colorings ranging from silver- or blue-black through to tan with a distinctive soft-haired topknot on their head.

The Australian Terrier is tough and cheeky and stands 9in to 11in high. However, like many other terrier breeds, in its own mind, it is a much larger dog and is quite fearless. It is energetic and loyal and will display great affection to its family. It is confident and curious, has keen hearing and eyesight and therefore makes a useful watchdog. Because it likes to please its master is can be more easily trained than some other terriers.

Unlike many other terrier breeds, the Australian Terrier does not usually display aggression towards other dogs although they may chase small animals outside the home. They can occasionally display wariness towards strangers although they are not excessively suspicious. They travel well and can be somewhat easier to train than other terrier types although their training needs to be strict; their self-assured nature can make them want to follow their own ideas rather than yours!

Australian terriers make good apartment dogs. They are adaptable and will remain active indoors but will require outdoor exercise and, like all terriers, need to be walked on a leash due to their tendency to chase other animals.





The Australian Terrier sheds little or no hair and will not require clipping except perhaps around the eyes and ears when blunt-nosed scissors should be used. Regular brushing is recommended. This will stimulate natural oil secretion from the skin which will help to develop a high gloss to the coat. Clip the toenails regularly. Australian Terriers do not require washing more than once a month. More frequent washing will tend to make their tough coat go lank.

Your Australian Terrier will consider himself to be a part of your family and will be a loyal and loving companion.




Wednesday, April 18, 2018

CLUMBER SPANIEL DOG Breed Description and History

Clumber Spaniel - Photo: Wikimedia
Description: The Clumber Spaniel is low to the ground with heavy bones and short legs. The head is large and broad, with a deep muzzle, combined with a heavy brow. The nose is large and comes in various shades of brown. The teeth meet in a scissor bite. The eyes are amber in colour and deep-set. The chest is wide and deep, with the front legs being straight.

The Clumber Spaniel ears are triangular in shape, set low and hang downwards. The neck is muscular and heavy, and the fur is feathered at the throat. The tail is docked, in countries that permit this, and is feathered. The coat is dense, flat and straight, being soft to the touch. This coat is mainly white, with orange or lemon markings. Their weight is 55 to 85 pounds and their height is 41 to 51 inches. Their life expectancy is ten to twelve years.

History: The dogs contributed to making this breed were, the Basset hound, St Bernard, and Alpine Spaniel. There is no proof, but it is believed this breed was created in 18th century France by one of the Dukes of Noailles. Threatened by the French Revolution, the Duke transferred his dogs to England, to his closest family, the Duke of Newcastle. Here the breed was in favour of royalty and the name possibly derives from the Duke of Newcastle's estate called Cumber Park.



This is the heaviest of the Spaniel's and is a slow, quiet hunter. This dog is able to work independently or within a pack showing good endurance to do particularly well in dense undergrowth, and they have a fine sense of smell. This breed has been trained to retrieve and track. In 1848, the breed arrived in Canada, and from there made its way to the United States. The Clumber Spaniel was first recognized by the AKC in 1884.