Saturday, February 17, 2018

ALASKAN MALAMUTE - The Nordic Sled Dog

English: Alaskan Malamute "Inu" in N...
Alaskan Malamute "Inu" in Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The Alaskan Malamute is a medium-large to large dog that weighs between 70-95 pounds and measures up to 25". They are best known as sled dogs and are used to hard work. They ideal for cold climates or homes that will keep them cool and hydrated in hot summers. The Alaskan Malamute has a thick, coarse outer coat and wooly, dense undercoat. They are dressed for cold weather. If you own an Alaskan Malamute and live in a warmer climate, you need to make sure that they have a place to get out of the sun and plenty of water.

They come in a variety of colors including solid white, shadings of light to medium gray, black, sable, and red. In animals with shadings, parts of legs, feet, the underbody, and part of face markings are predominantly white. The AKC does not recognize any other solid colors than white.

Alaskan Malamutes are independent, friendly and loyal. They are more active as puppies and tend to mellow when they get older. They are chewers, diggers, and explorers. If you don't want it played with then put it away. When your Alaskan Malamute is outside, make sure that they can't dig out of the yard or jump over the fence. They are not a good apartment, small home or city dogs. They love to be outside and need plenty of room to play. Because they are extremely playful as puppies, they would be better for older children until they become calmer. They work best with other animals and pets when they are socialized at a young age. They can be aggressive towards other dogs and can consider small animals prey. This is an ideal dog for a family home that allows plenty of outdoor time to play and explore

The breed dates back over 2000 years and is a native of Alaska. They were originally used as sled dogs by the Alaskan Malamute Eskimo tribe. In addition to a companion dog, the Alaskan Malamutes are still used as sled dogs for racing, exploration, and families living in arctic regions.

As hardworking sled dogs, they are important household pets for families living in cold, snow-covered areas and imperative to their way of life. If you are looking for an independent but loving companion, the Alaskan Malamute is a perfect dog for you.




Friday, February 16, 2018

ALASKAN HUSKY Puppy - Puppies of the World

Alaskan Husky Puppy - Puppies of the World



Thursday, February 15, 2018

Keeping Your Dog Safe On the Road - DOG CAR SEAT

This traffic is for the dogs.
Photo  by kennethkonica 
Car rides are the favorite of many dogs.  There are some precautions you can take to make sure this activity will be enjoyable for both of you for years to come.

If you have any type of car with a trunk open to the inside of the car or with some other vehicles, you can have your dog ride in the back separated from you by a gate or a net. If you have a regular car, there are special dog seat belts and other types of restraints available. You don’t want your dog flying forward if you must stop quickly.  You also don’t want him trying to climb into the front and distracting you.

Dog owners who drive a pickup truck should not let dogs ride free in the pickup bed. This can create a dangerous situation for the dog and other drivers if your dog falls out or decides to jump out. Dogs that ride without restraints in the pickup bed may go flying if you stop short and suddenly. Tying the dog in the bed is not a good idea either as the dog may still jump or fall out and wind up being choked or dragged along the road The best and safest solution is to have your dog ride in the cab of the truck with you. . 

Never leave your dog in the car with the windows completely up—especially in summer.  The interior of a car can heat up quickly, reaching temperatures in excess of 120 degrees in a very short time.  This could cause heat exhaustion and even death in your dog.  If you are going to have to leave the vehicle and can’t take your dog with you, it is best to leave him at home for this trip. It is better to have him disappointed today than not around tomorrow.




Wednesday, February 14, 2018

How A DOG OBEDIENCE School Changed My Life

A German Shepherd Dog being trained to retriev...
A German Shepherd Dog being trained to retrieve over a small A-frame (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
A few years back I took my dog to an obedience school because it was acting crazy most of the time. After attending a couple of classes I realized that it was not my dog who was acting crazy, it was me.

When you join a dog obedience school you learn how to train your dog to behave appropriately. In the first stages of training puppies, it is very common that their owners take them to a dog obedience school.

The training is usually done in small groups, where in addition to train the dog itself, it also teaches the dog’s owner how to train, scold and praise the dog.

Actually, a professional dog trainer does not really train the dog; he is training the dog’s owner how to do the training. You can, though, send your dog away to a dog training school alone. But you as the owner must still learn skills to reinforce what the dog has learned on the dog school. If you attend a class together with your dog, you and your dog have a much better chance of learning more about each other as a team under professional guidance.

Every person who has to handle the dog should take part in the training to ensure consistent methods and commands. Or else the dog can get very confused.

I felt like quitting a lot of times because it was harder to change my own behavior than changing my dog’s behavior. I had to learn how to praise my dog more than scolding it. I was amazed.



The strange thing is that, because I started to look at myself in a new perspective, it suddenly came very clear to me that; it was not just my relationship to my dog that needed to change. It was my attitude towards other people as well. A huge eye-opener, that was hard to swallow. And when I look back I can truly say that attending that dog obedience school really changed my life. I would not be the person I am today. And that counts both towards dogs as well as people.

If you are in doubt about whether you should attend a class with your dog or not – don’t be.



Tuesday, February 13, 2018

AIREDALE TERRIER - The King of the Terriers

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Photo  by E Haug 
The Airedale Terrier is a medium 45 to 65-pound dog that usually reaches between 22" and 24". Known as the King of the Terriers, they are largest of the Terrier breeds recognized by the AKC. It is a compact little powerhouse that is all terrier when it comes to chasing little animals or appeasing its curiosity.

Airedale Terriers are typically tan on the ears, head, chest, undersides, legs, and sometimes on the shoulders.  They are black or grizzle on the sides and upper parts of the body.  Sometimes they have a red mixture on the black or white markings on the chest.  Certain strains of the breed also have a small white patch on the chest.  Their wiry, dense outer coat requires regular grooming.

If you are looking for a dog with plenty of stamina and energy, look no further.   The Airedale Terrier is full of energy and needs daily exercise and play.  Generally speaking, they do best with older well-behaved children and are not ideal for homes with smaller pets as terriers have the tendency to chase small animals and vermin.  They can do well with other dogs, especially if they are socialized from puppyhood.  They are loyal and protective of their family.  They love to learn and can be trained easily provided training is fun and not monotonous.

The breed dates itself back to 18th century England. The breed is a cross between an Otterhound and a Waterside Terrier.  They were bred for hunting small game and were later used in big game hunting, police work and as an army dog in WWII.  The Airedale Terrier is now considered more of a family pet than working dog.  However, they do love to work and have tasks to do and still make good hunting and tracking dogs

For a family that enjoys outdoors and exercise, the Airedale Terrier is an excellent choice.  Although they can work with other pets and dogs, a one pet household seems more ideal for their needs unless they grow up with other family pets.  The Airedale Terrier is a great pet for the family on the go.