Thursday, October 18, 2018

BONES for Your Dog - Delicious Treat or A Deadly Snack?

Photo: Pixabay
There is a difference of opinion among canine experts as to whether bones should be given to a dog raw, cooked, hard, or soft, and even whether they should be given at all. On one point, however, there is total agreement, never give a dog splintering bones from chicken, pork, fowl, and rabbit, (although chicken bones that have been cooked in a pressure cooker until they are very soft can be quite nourishing and safe).

A marrow bone is the traditional symbol of a treat for a dog, and he obviously appreciates it. It may be too big and hard for small dogs. In fact, large breeds generally handle bones much better than small ones. Bones that are mostly cartilage, such as spinal and shoulder bones of veal, knuckle bones, and soft rib bones, are good chewing material that can be entirely consumed.

The real danger is intestinal compaction, especially in small dogs, if the masticated bone has not been mixed with another residue in the dog's stomach. A small amount should cause no trouble if it is given right after a meal. Chop and steak bones are more dangerous. Careful eaters simply clean off the meat and fat, but greedy gobblers run the risk of internal injury from jagged bone splinters. The same is true of a leg of lamb bone.

What is the best policy to follow with a dog of your own? A teething puppy between four and six months of age should always have a bone, real or imitation, to chew on. You might give an adult dog a suitable bone as an occasional treat - for example, once a week. It will give him enormous pleasure, will help to keep his teeth clean and free from tartar, and will occupy him for several hours. But a nylon bone offers the same advantages without the risk!



Wednesday, October 17, 2018

CANINE DIABETES; is Your Dog at Risk?

Army Sgt. William A. Peyton, Jr. a JDOG dog ha...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The classic early warning signs of diabetes were all present when I brought my canine companion of twelve years into the Veterinarian's clinic. Muffy was lethargic, unsteady on her feet, drinking large amounts of water, and experiencing incontinence for the first time in her life. I knew something was seriously wrong.

After blood work and a physical examination, the veterinarian said that Muffy had developed type-two canine diabetes. After a brief discussion, we decided to try and regulate her blood sugar level with diet modification and insulin twice daily. 

At first, it was rough going. Weekly checkups revealed Muffy's sugar levels continued to bounce from one extreme to the other. Determined not give up, I monitored her urine samples at home for sugar content and adjusted insulin injections as necessary. Gradually, we began to see improvement.

After just a few months Muffy was once again her frisky self. You would never know by watching her race about that she had a serious health problem. A special diet, proper amounts of insulin and regular exercise have worked together with Muffy's routine veterinary care to turn the tide. As a result, I can look forward to many more happy years with my little dog.

Wyoming veterinarian Mary Flitner, who recently moved her practice to New Mexico, received her D.V.M. degree at Colorado State University and an award for excellence in large animal surgery in 1997. Flitner states that diabetes in dogs and cats is more common than most people realize. According to Flitner, a pet's chance of developing diabetes will increase with age. 

"This is especially true in overweight, less active dogs."

Besides weight and age, diet is another significant factor. Dogs given table scraps without discrimination are, particularly at risk. The importance of diet cannot be overemphasized, warns Flitner. 

"A high fiber diet, low in fat and sugar, is vital. And an annual checkup by a qualified professional is also an important part of proper pet care, as early detection of health complications increase successful management of the problem and helps prolong the quality of life for that pet." 

Flitner notes many pet owners mistakenly feel caring for a diabetic pet would be too difficult for them, an assumption that complicates the decision making the process at a critical time. 

"A diagnosis of diabetes in a family pet is hard enough to handle without misconceptions compounding the problem," said Flitner thoughtfully.


For instance, a pet owner might opt to euthanize a pet diagnosed with diabetes because they feel incapable of managing the problem. However, with proper instruction and guidance, that same pet owner could gain the confidence necessary to properly follow the care plan developed by the veterinarian, and enjoy many more quality years together with their pet. 

"People need to know by regulating their pet's diabetes, that pet can still live to their full potential," said Flitner, acknowledging most caregivers consider their pet an important part the family and struggle to make right health care decisions for them. 

Flitner notes grocery store quality pet foods are not good choices for diabetic pets because of added fillers and sugars used to improve the taste. 

"Some grocery store brands of cat food actually have trace elements of antifreeze in them, because cats are attracted to it. These type foods often have a high content of sodium, which is also unhealthy for the pet.

"A healthy well-balanced diet is important for any pet, but especially for those diagnosed with diabetes." 

Early warning signs that might indicate diabetes in your pet include: an unusually high consumption of water, increase in appetite, incontinence, lethargy, extreme changes in eyes (i.e. cataracts), lack of coordination, and vomiting. Caregivers who note such changes in their dog should promptly call a qualified professional because examination by a veterinarian is important and necessary for proper diagnosis. 

Flitner also acknowledges the temptation to remove the water bowl from the pet's reach if incontinence is a problem. 

"But, this is not the correct thing to do," instructs Flitner. 

In the case of diabetic canines, drinking large amounts of water is the dog's attempt to flush glucose out of the kidneys which have spilled over from the blood. If the glucose doesn't get flushed out, serious damage to the kidneys and other organs can develop. 

The best preventative measures against serious health problems in the family pet remain simple and practical: regular veterinary check-ups and a healthy diet. Exercise is also very important. Among other benefits, exercise helps increase the body's effective use of insulin

© Lori S. Anton
Savvy Pet Editor



Tuesday, October 16, 2018

BELGIAN LAEKENOIS - The Rare Belgian Sheepdog

Righel, a nine months old Belgian shepherd Lae...
Righel, a nine months old Belgian shepherd Laekenois.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
This medium-sized breed weighs between 50-65 pounds and reaches between 22" to 26" in height. Their name is pronounced LAK-in-wah. The Belgian Laekenois is the rarest of four Belgian Sheepdogs. Bred to herd sheep, this breed remains a working breed today. 

The AKC recognizes three of the Belgian Sheepdogs but does not recognize the Belgian Laekenois. Their color ranges from red to fawn and mahogany to gray. They may or may not have a dark masking on their face. Their harsh, rough, wiry coat is over 2" in length and gives them an unkempt or tousled appearance. Their coat is waterproofed and they should not be bathed on a regular basis. They only require minimal grooming and should never be clipped too closely.

This energetic, protective and intelligent breed is more of a working dog than a family companion. The Belgian Laekenois loves to work and is happiest when they have a job to do. They are excellent farm dogs, herding dogs and watchdogs. They can also make a good family pet for active families. The Belgian Laekenois has an abundance of energy and loves to be on the go. They are not meant to be indoors all day and are happiest when they have plenty of room to run and play. Early socialization is a must for other pets, dogs and children. Early training is also recommended. They have a herding instinct and will herd family and pets alike. 

The Belgian Laekenois originated in Belgium. It is one of four Belgian Sheepdogs. They are often recognized as distinct breeds, but in some countries, they are actually all considered to be one breed. Originally bred to watch over linen bleaching fields, they were later used to watch over sheep. They are now used for herding and as guard dogs.



Work, work and more work is the Belgian Laekenois' motto. They love to have a job to do and are not a lazy breed by any means. To have a happy Belgian Laekenois, they need a family that will recognize their energy level and work instinct and makes sure that both those needs are met. If you are a family that likes to relax inside all the time, then the Belgian Laekenois is probably not for you.



Monday, October 15, 2018

FLEAS - A Common Resident In Every House

English: This photo was taken by Andy Brookes ...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
They are one of the greatest bloodsucking parasites which can cause a lot of damage. These different types of fleas live by sucking blood from mammals and birds. Some of the very common fleas are the cat flea, dog flea, human flea, northern rat flea and oriental rat flea. You may suffer from an allergic reaction and may also get transmitted with severe diseases due to these fleas. Because of the warm, humid and readily available environment in your home, these fleas easily survive without much hindrance.

They procreate in huge numbers which makes them next to - indestructible. Many times these fleas just become a nuisance other than anything else. Their small fish like structure goes unnoticed which makes it difficult to detect. Presence of pets in your house is another reason for fleas to attack humans. Having a spick and span environment keeps them off from your mattresses. The growth rate is so high that it becomes next to impossible to end the reign of terror. Some of the common effects fleabites have on us is a loss of hair, severe allergic reaction - rashes, itchy skin and severe diseases.

Home Remedies for Fleas

Keep your house clean by regular vacuuming as well as cleaning and bathing your pets to avoid any circulation of these parasites.

One of the most natural repellents which we have come across to fight fleas is the eucalyptus leaves. Somehow the smell is a major turn off for them.

You can use borax, which works great against the fleas. Spread it across your house; let it sit for some days and later vacuum your house to remove those fleas.

Spreading cedar chips along with your fence line or in your room can keep the fleas at bay. You can also have a tansy plant outside your dogs' pen to keep the fleas away.

Make garlic an important part of pets’ food. Mix it, crush it, mince it, powder it and use it in any form to keep the pest away from the pets.

Adding yeast pills to your dog's diet also gets rid of the fleas. These yeast pills can be easily found in any of the medical stores.

Try diatomaceous earth, is one of the most natural ways to get rid of fleas. It can be used be in your house, around the house and on your dog.

Warning: The reader of this article should exercise all precautionary measures while following instructions on the home remedies from this article. Avoid using any of these products if you are allergic to it. The responsibility lies with the reader and not with the site or the writer.



Saturday, October 13, 2018

How To Obtain Organic Gourmet DOG TREATS

Puppies eating
Photo   by Christian Haugen 
Certain animals are kept by lots of people as pets due to various reasons. Most commonly, the companionship which can be offered to such by these certain animals is wanted, especially when lonely or sad moments are experienced. For this matter, these pets have to be taken good care of and their basic necessities provided to them.


They need to provide them with shelter, clean water, and, most importantly, their food. Dog owners may like to give organic gourmet dog treats to their pets. There are a couple of things which these owners should take into consideration when they will purchase these foods for such pets.

To start, he could be requesting for some referrals from some groups of individuals. Such individuals may include his relatives, his friends, or his coworkers. These persons could be referring to a brand which he may be giving to his canine. The purchaser must be writing down the brand name of this commodity and also the certain source where he might be getting this product from. He might also need to really be conducting research about the brand which each individual refers to him.

The ingredients utilized by the manufacturers to get these commodities created are needed to be known by the persons. Different available ingredients can certainly be used by these manufacturers. However, some ingredients could also cause allergic reactions from the canines. The effects of some ingredients to the animals needed to get known by these owners.

They should locate the sources or the establishments where they can purchase these commodities. Primarily, they can get these foods from various pet shops that they can find in almost any region. They need to ensure that they will only choose those sources which hold positive reputations. This way, they would have assurances that they will receive good quality foods.

He might also be turning to the Internet in looking for such source. Nowadays, most establishments are already creating and managing their own web pages where customers could easily be contacting them when doing various different business transactions. If a person decides to be ordering his product online, he needs to receive his own order within an acceptable amount of time.

These buyers also need to consider the prices of the foods which they might buy. These prices may vary since there is competition present in this industry. The sellers typically set different criteria to establish these rates. The purchasers must choose the brands which will fall within the budgets that they will apportion for their purchases.


The expiry dates of the commodities must also be looked at. If products that already reached their expiry dates are obtained, certain consequences would be suffered from by dogs. Food poisoning or even other dangerous situations may be experienced by these animals. The expiry dates are usually found on the package labels.

At times, a canine might not be liking the food which its owner places in front of it. It could only be wasting the food which the owner will be giving to it. In this case, the individual must consistently be training the animal of consuming such a commodity. This way, he would not be wasting both the product and his money.

    About the Author: Kathrine Franks