Friday, December 14, 2018

Fact Sheet: CHOW CHOW

(Original Title: CHOW CHOW Dog Breed Profile Information)

Chow Chow
Photo by Prayitno

Description:

The Chow Chow is most recognizable for its full, bear-like coat. This breed is medium-large with a height range of 18 to 22 inches and weights between 45 and 70 pounds. The double coat of the Chow Chow is extremely dense and is found in smooth and rough varieties. There is a such an abundance of neck hair that it forms a noticeable ruff. The Chow Chow's tail is carried curled up over the back and is held close to the body. The tongue of this dog is blue, usually with a black underside. The coat is always a solid color, with red, black, cream, and blue being among the most common colors. This breed can live for up to 15 years.

History:
The Chow Chow developed in China, in the Mongolian region and is believed to be a very ancient breed of dog. This dog was a multi-purpose dog in the region of its origin and was used for hunting, drawing sleds, and as food. This breed was referred to by different names in China, and the name it now bears was bestowed on it by English sea captains, who brought the dog with them to England. General cargo was called "chow chow" and the name transferred onto the dog. Some believe the name also means food.

Temperament:
Known for a sometimes aloof manner, the Chow Chow is nevertheless a dog that will bond strongly with one person. This dog will get along well with children, but older children are best here. Socialization with other pets and people is important with this breed and training should begin while the dog is young. Although this dog breed has something of a reputation for aggression, this is mostly a result of poor breeding practices. The owner of this breed should exhibit authority so that the dog does not attempt to be the 'leader of the pack'.

Health Issues:
The Chow Chow is a fairly healthy breed but can be subject to various ailments. Hip and elbow dysplasia are found in this dog and it can also suffer from entropion. This dog can also develop bloat and if it does so, must be taken to the veterinarian immediately for treatment. Several small meals and a quiet time after eating can help prevent this serious condition. This breed, because of its relatively short muzzle will often snore.





Grooming:
Regardless of whether a Chow Chow is going to be used as a family pet or as a show dog, it needs a great deal of daily grooming. This dog's coat is much too thick and long to allow to go without brushing every day. This dog breed will experience a heavy shed twice a year and will need extra attention at this time.

Living Conditions:
The Chow Chow is a fairly quiet dog inside and will do well for apartment living if given a walk every day. As this dog has a somewhat reserved character, it does not mind living outside as long as it receives some attention every day from the person with whom it has bonded. The thick coat enables this dog to live outside even in winter.



Thursday, December 13, 2018

BOXER DOG Training

Boxer Dog - Photo: Wikimedia
The Boxer is an amazing dog and is extremely playful, energetic and definitely a handful (in a good way of course).  This breed of dog is extremely loyal and when a friendship is built it lasts forever.  The boxer is unique and not for everyone if you are a new owner of a boxer you have to be aware that they need a lot of attention and training.  They are extremely intelligent dogs, which can work to your advantage when it comes to training, but then again can be very disadvantageous, as they know how to use their intelligence to get what they want.

Boxer dog training consists of training them up to become guard dogs; this is their main profession if you like.  People who do not know boxers tend to assume that they are naturally aggressive when they are in fact the opposite and could not be more playful than any other dog!  Because of their good stature and aggressive look, people are automatically assuming this dog could do more harm than good.  If your boxer is not trained properly then he just might.

Because of their intelligence, Boxers can be very stubborn but when it comes to training a boxer, it can be very helpful.  Owners must remember that there will be times when you ask him to do something and he’s going to look you in the face and basically tell you where to go, he knows he is supposed to do what you are telling him but he decides he can't be bothered and doesn’t.  The main thing you have to remember in these circumstances is to be patient.  From as early as 6 weeks old you should start your boxer dog training as this will help him when he grows up, socialize him, play with him and teach him, but do it in an exciting way and he is more likely to listen.

The main aspect of training for a boxer is socialization.  Boxers can be very friendly dogs but they need to be trained to become one.  They need to get accustomed to other dogs and people.  The best way to do this is training classes.  That way your boxer will be trained alongside other dogs. 



When your boxer reaches 13-16 weeks old it's time for some serious boxer dog training, this is the stage where he is going to test for dominance, he will nip and try to show you that he is the more dominant one, mainly by not listening to you.  You have to be a strong leader at this time; you must show him that bad behaviours will not be tolerated no matter what!

Boxers are genuinely a lovable family dog and would make a proud pet for anyone, they are dogs that prefer to sit on your lap for a cuddle than anything else.  Train your boxer early with some serious boxer dog training and you can be assured you will have a stunning, loyal family friend!



Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Basic Commands For DOG OBEDIENCE

This Smooth Collie retrieves an obedience dumb...
This Smooth Collie retrieves an obedience dumbbell made of wood
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Are you bored with your dog who knows only three commands? Don't fret, my friend! You could probably use a little jazz.  Specific command words are not that difficult and important. The thing here should be the consistency of its usage. My friend, Wiki, here can give you a bit of a blast. Some of these certain commands are accepted as standard, while others are commonly used.

Here is a list you might find quite interesting:

Let us start off with the basic commands

1.) Sit – it is a mono-syllabic word that requires a bit of an authentic tone that would require for your dog to be in a sitting position.

2.) Down – just like #1, this also requires an abrupt tone for the dog to be typically down when its elbows (front feet) and hocks (rear legs) are touching the ground or floor.

3.) Heel – The dog's head or shoulder is parallel to the handler's leg on the left side of the handler.

4.) Come or Here – (referred to as the recall) you just really got to call your dog which equates the whole command.

5.) Stay – another command that requires another snap for the dog to remain in the sitting position (sit, down, stand), and location under which the command was given until it is released by the handler

Those were just some of the basic ones, but wait! Here is something for those who are too hungry to actually stop.  The advanced commands are the following (which may need more patience and dedication): 

1.) Stop – Wiki says that the dog commanded will simply stop whatever it is doing, and lie down on command no matter how far it is from its keeper is a dog that can be taken anywhere. Some handlers use the German word PLATZ (related to place, i.e. stay in position) for this action.  A little bit demanding, but who knows when your dogs need it.

2.) Back up – keepers of large dogs or dogs with a reputation (a must quote!) for aggressiveness can make strangers more comfortable by teaching the dog to back up on command. This command might probably be very useful for police dogs.

3.) Growl – now this is what you guys should be talking about. In case you are bullied, this is the inverse of backing up. Some owners teach non-aggressive dogs to growl on a subtle command –not the word "growl", just usually a small hand gesture –as a way of letting strangers know that you and your dog value being left alone.

4.) Steady – to keep nearby. The dog can walk free, but not dash off. This can be very valuable to sport dogs, and/or during competitions.

5.) Stand – on this command, the dog stands still. Funny how this seems so advanced; it is very valuable for "grooming". Many dogs are groomed frequently, that they need to stand quietly during the process. You can also use this when you want your dog to wait for you at the park while lining up for an espresso at Starbucks seven in the morning.

6.) Go to bed, kennel, or get in – this command directs the dog to go to its bed, and remain there unreleased. This is somehow useful to keep a dog out from underfoot and safe in a busy or complicated situation.

7.) Drop or Drop it
– to release something they just picked up; very useful when they're about to chew your sandals off.

8.) Leave it – an adjunction to Drop, directing the dog NOT to touch an item.

9.) Take it – the dog leaves the desired object untouched until given this command.

10.) Give – a command teaching the dog to be generous, and/or releasing something your pet has placed in his mouth on your hand.

11.) Speak – another way of saying "to bark ONLY when I say so".

12.) Rollover – can be one of the basic commands; this is when the dog lies down, roll over, and stand back up. Quite a bit of an exercise.

13.) Attack – if partnered with the command "Growl", you (the owner) will be the king of your neighborhood, though mostly used only on Police Dogs. Common commands are either "Attack" or "Sick'em".

14.) Fetch – can also be one of the basic commands where the dog retrieves a thrown object, bringing it back to the one who threw it, a nice strategy for luring guard dogs (especially when they're obsessed with balls).


Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Dog Food ALLERGIES

Food of Italy
Food of Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Food allergies are something that is difficult to identify unless one is well aware of the baseline information with regard to this type of allergy. The main symptoms of food allergies in dogs include the facial itching, limb chewing, belly itching, recurrent ear infections or skin infections. 

Since the dogs consume a lot of prepared food materials including various kinds of proteins, fillers, coloring agents and more; in the commercial food materials, the incidences of food allergies are more than one can imagine. Allergic reactions mostly involve the skin or the gastrointestinal tract. 

If you come across your dog itching after the provision of specific food materials, then suspect the food allergy in this animal. However, conditions like fungal infections need to be ruled out in general before the conclusion of itching as a sign of food allergy.

There are many recorded incidences of allergies of dogs to corn or to wheat. However, the food allergies vary from dog to dog.  Read the labels clearly before feeding your dogs with pet food materials, in such occasions.  Too much-colored food materials may be avoided since they may cause allergies to your dog.



Food allergies are often linked to the hyperactive behavior noticed in the dogs. Added colors, preservatives, and high-fat diet might cause such food allergies in the dogs and hence, one has to be careful in providing new kind of diet to their dogs and closely monitor the dog for any signs of allergy.   

There are many occasions that food allergies might be diagnosed in the dogs but the dog may have other problems like pancreatitis. To rule out the food allergies, observation your dogs everytime you feed them, look for reasons to link the signs of dog with food given, specific signs encountered, differential diagnosis etc. are the important features to be given emphasis. 



Monday, December 10, 2018

What To Know About A CRAZY CAT Lady

None - This image is in the public domain and ...
 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Cats are popular among pet owners. Dogs and cats are among the most common household pets that people have around the globe. There are numerous reasons why people like cats and some may own multiple. Crazy cat lady is used to describe a women who dote on these felines. She may have these as her own pets or take in any that she comes into contact with. The term is often used in a derogatory way, but not everyone considers this to be a negative thing.

In some cultures and regions, women with cats are considered spinsters. This is particularly the case when they have no husband, children and multiple cats. Many have come to associate these women with people who have trouble being in relationships or finding partners.

Cat lady is often a term that is linked to those who are also animal hoarders. That is, people who have a large number of cats. Many times they have so many that they are unable to properly care for them and they are often ill. Usually these animal hoarders suffer with other mental illnesses that make them unaware of the dangers they are creating for themselves and the animals. They are usually ignorant to the severity of their situation and often interventions of some sort are needed to get the person and the cats the help they need.

There have been famous cat ladies in pop culture and even documentaries or movies that highlight these feline-loving women. Still, this is not considered a positive title to have. Cat lady syndrome is becoming a more commonly used term that is backed by some scientific research.

Studies have found a parasite that is present in some cats. It is known as Toxoplasma gondii and it is associated with mental and behavioral disorders in people. Some suggest that this can have a big affect on the health of cat owners, especially of those who have multiple felines living in their home.

Risk is heightened when dealing with multiple cats, many that are ill. Hoarding cats is expected to result in negative impacts on physical and mental health of pets and owners. It can also lead to problems with the animals and keep them from living happy and healthy lives. Some cats die. Those who survive are often extremely ill. Typically the homes are unclean and owners cannot properly care for each one of the cats.

Those who know people like this should seek help for them. Most of the time they are unaware of the need for changes. In fact, they are often under the false belief that they have control of this situation. This is why interventions are so common in these situations.

Those who are in these positions are often not mentally well. They can benefit from support by others, including medical professionals. It is also important to intervene for the sake of the animals. Although it is not the intent of the cat lady to harm the animals, they do so in these situations. Owning too many animals is unsanitary and problematic, no matter how much care and attention the cats are receiving. People should report cat ladies to help them.


    About the Author: by Olive Pate