Monday, June 1, 2020

The importance of the physical EXAMINATION

A dog (Cavalier_King_Charles_Spaniel) with a b...
A dog (Cavalier_King_Charles_Spaniel) with a bandaged foot.
Note the suspenders made from a pair of human suspenders. (Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
The importance of the physical examination need not be underestimated in the case of dogs. Simple but systematic physical examination techniques may diagnose most of the disorders in dogs and hence, without physical examination of the dog, one should not resort to knowing the status of your dog's health

Simply observe the dog with scratching. Catch the dog and simply separate the hair material from the itching site. To the surprise, you may come across a big wound in the scratched site. The wound might be the main reason for the scratching of the dog at that site. However, one has to rule out the occurrence of wounds by severe itching itself.

Many times, when the scratching dog is examined physically, one can come across plenty of lice infestation or tick problems in the skin and coat. The parasitic condition might not be diagnosed at all if one has not carried out the physical examination. Similarly, the dog may reveal the signs of pain when the physical examination is carried out by deep palpation technique.  The dog show signs of pain when the dog is examined in the stomach or the back regions. 

Even if it is possible that by pressure based palpation, one can detect the acute renal disorders in the affected dogs turn to the examined site at the region of the kidney or at the back region. The dog affected by the Cystitis with severe retention of urine is often diagnosed by mere physical examination. 

The filled bladder together with signs of pain during the examination at the site of urinary bladder indicates that the animal is affected by Cystitis.  Auscultation of the heart in both right and left sides helps to rule out the abnormal heart sounds and the pulmonary area based auscultation reveals the respiratory system disorder like pneumonia. 



Sunday, May 31, 2020

DOG BREEDS A-Z

Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan Malamute 
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Finding the perfect pet is difficult when there are so many different breeds to choose from. Use this guide to learn more about a few of the different breeds available.

Alaskan Malamute
The Alaskan Malamute is the oldest Arctic dog breed in the world and was bred as a working dog. They were used to pull sleds as well as hunt. This is a friendly dog that makes a great family pet. They love children but aren't fond of the company of other dogs. They are a smart breed that can learn quickly but tend to get bored easily.

To groom this breed you will need to brush their fur out weekly. Some of the health concerns associated with this breed include growth problems, eye problems, and hip dysplasia.

Bloodhound
The Bloodhound, also referred to as the St. Hubert's Hound or the Chien St. Hubert, is a Belgium breed that was bred tracking and hunting. This is one of the oldest hound breeds in the world. They typically grow to be between 23 and 27 inches tall and they usually weigh between 80 and 90 pounds. They have a short smooth coat that is waterproof. Their coat colors vary between black and tan and red and tan. Red Bloodhounds can also be found. They have folds of skin around their face and neck which help to gather scent and direct it towards their nose.

To care for this breed you will need to rub down their coats with a wet towel a few times a week. Their toenails will also need to be clipped on a weekly basis. Their ears also need to be tended to on a regular basis. For exercise, this breed needs daily runs and lots of playtimes. To keep their minds stimulated you may want to introduce tracking games. This breed has a few health concerns that you should be aware of: hip dysplasia, inverted eyelids, and bloating.

Boxer
The Boxer is a German breed that was created by crossing a Bullenbeisser, an unknown breed, and an English Bulldog. This breed was originally very aggressive and used for fighting and baiting bulls. However, over the years this breed lost their aggressiveness and it has become better suited for family life.

The boxer is a mid-sized dog breed that typically stands between 21 and 25 inches tall. They usually weigh between 66 and 70 pounds. Their coat is short, smooth, and shiny. Their coat can come in a variety of colors and have several different marking patterns. Some of the most common colors Boxers have included white, brindle, and fawn.

Brussels Griffon
The Brussels Griffon also referred to as the Griffon Belge, the Griffon Bruxellois, and the Belgian Griffon is a small Belgium dog breed that was used to kill vermin in horse stables. This interesting looking little fellow stands between 7 and 8 inches tall and weighs in at a whopping 6 to 12 pounds. They come in two varieties, rough hair and smooth hair. Both versions can be found with black, black and tan, or red-colored coats.

To care for this little dog you will want to brush their coat several times a week to prevent matting and to remove debris and dirt. They can usually get enough exercise to stay healthy by playing indoors, however, they also enjoy spending time frolicking outside and going for short walks. This dog will need to be trained and you will need to be consistent with your praise and corrections. If you plan on breeding this dog you should understand that they have a very difficult time whelping and only about 60 percent of puppies make it. In addition to reproductive problems, this breed also has respiratory issues and eye problems.

Chihuahua
The Chihuahua is a Mexican breed that was discovered about 100 years ago. They are a toy dog that stands between 6 and 9 inches tall and they typically weigh less than 6 pounds. Their coats come in two variations, short and long. The long coat is soft and can be either straight or wavy. The short coat is soft and dense. Both coat variations can come in just about any color or color combination.

To care for this breed you will need to groom their hair daily for the long-haired version, and as needed for the short hair version. This is an indoor pet that is not suited for extended periods of time outside. However, they do enjoy playing outside and going for short walks. To manage this breed's temperament you need to socialize it and train it early. Some of the health concerns that are associated with this breed include kneecap problems, eye problems, and tracheal problems.

English Springer Spaniel
The English Springer Spaniel also referred to as the Norfolk Spaniel, is a British breed that is known for being the oldest spaniel breed in the world. They were originally developed as a hunting dog. Their name derives from the springy steps that they take when on the hunt. Today this breed is still used as a hunting dog, however, they also make a great family pet if trained and socialized properly.

The English Springer Spaniel requires regular grooming to keep its coat shiny and clean. The best type of brush to use on their soft coat is a stiff bristle brush. Bathing should only be done when they need it. This breed also needs a lot of exercises. Long walks and plenty of playtime in the yard or in a fenced-in park each day will keep them healthy, happy, and out of trouble.

Fox Terrier (Smooth)
The Fox Terrier (Smooth) is a cute little dog that originated in England as a vermin hunter. This breed was grouped with the Wired Fox Terrier until 1984 when it was established as its own unique breed. Today this breed is still used to hunt vermin, however, it is also used as a family pet.

The Smooth Fox Terrier is a playful, energetic breed that loves playing with kids. If you have other pets in your family this breed may chase them, especially if they are small like cats. And they may try to take the dominant role if you have other dogs. To keep them happy and healthy they will need lots of exercise, lots of mental stimulation, and a lot of attention. They are intelligent and respond well to obedience training, however, they have a stubborn streak that may keep them from coming to you when you call them, especially if they are having fun.

English: Basil the wire haired fox terrier
Basil the wire-haired fox terrier
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Fox Terrier (Wire)
The Fox Terrier (Wire), also called the Wire Fox Terrier, is a British breed that was developed back in the 19th century as a vermin hunter. This breed most likely descends from the Beagle, Shropshire, and Cheshire. Today, this very active dog breed is used as both a family pet and a vermin hunter.

This little dog stands about 15.5 inches tall and weighs between 16 and 18 pounds. They have short wiry hair that gives them a plush look. Their coats should be predominantly white with tan and/or black markings. This dog makes a great playmate for kids. However, you will want to be careful what other pets you pair this dog with as it has a tendency to chase anything that is small than it is.

Greyhound
The Greyhounds is an Egyptian breed that was originally used to hunt wolves, wild boars, and deer. This breed was originally associated with aristocracy and high-class citizenship. Today this breed is used for racing, hunting, and for pets.

The Greyhound is a tall athletic dog that stands between 27 and 30 inches tall and weighs between 60 and 70 pounds. They usually have a short, close coat that comes in a variety of colors including multi-color, white, blue, fallow brindle, black, and red. This dog is truly a gentle giant that is great with kids. Since they were bred as hunting dogs they have a natural instinct to chase anything smaller then they are so they may not be the best housemates for small pets.

Puli
The Puli, also called the Pulik, the Hungarian Puli and the Hungarian Water Dog is a herding dog that originated in Hungary. It is a medium-sized dog that stands between 14 and 19 inches tall and weighs between 20 and 40 pounds. They have a shaggy and weatherproof outercoat and a soft wooly undercoat. Their coloring is usually pretty dark. The most common colors found in this breed include black, dark rust, gray, and apricot.

Sealyham Terrier
The Sealyham Terrier is a terrier breed that originated in Wales. This breed most likely developed from crossing the Cheshire Terrier, the Welsh Corgi, the Dandi Dinmont Terrie, the West Highland Terrier, and the Fox Terrier. It is a small dog that only stands about 12 inches high and it weighs between 18 and 20 pounds. They have a coat similar to the Scottish Terrier, however, their coat colors are slightly different. The Sealyham Terrier comes in shades of white, lemon, blue, badger pied, black, and brown.

Vizsla
The Vizsla, also called the Hungarian Vizsla, the Magyar Vizsla, the Drotszoru Magyar Vizsla, and the Hungarian Pointer is a Hungarian sporting dog breed. They are a medium-sized dog that stands between 22.5 and 25 inches tall and that weighs between 48.5 and 66 pounds. They have a short straight coat that comes in a brownish-red color. White traces on their chest and feet are common.
The Vizsla is a sweet nature dog that is gentle and tolerant. They make a great family dog and companion, as well as a great hunting dog.

Anakin (Whippet)
Anakin (Whippet) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Whippet
The Whippet is a British breed that was created by crossing the Greyhound with a variety of terrier breeds. This dog was originally used as a mouser and vermin hunter, however, they also made a living at the dog races. Today this dog is used for both huntings and as a companion.

The Whippet is a hound dog that stands between 17 and 20 inches tall and weighs about 28 pounds. They have a short, fine coat that comes in a variety of colors and patterns. When you look at this dog they look just like a miniature Greyhound.

Yorkshire Terrier
The Yorkshire Terrier is a toy dog breed that originated in Great Britain. They were originally used as a lap dog and fashion accessory by the Victorian aristocracy. Many dog experts believe that this breed was created by crossing the Skye Terrier, Clydesdale Terrier, the Manchester Terrier, the Paisley, and the Maltese.

The Yorkshire Terrier is petite and it only stands between 6 and 9 inches tall and it weighs between 3 and 7 pounds. They have a silk long coat that is variegated. Steel-blue and tan are common shades found in their coat.



Sunday, May 24, 2020

Cutting Your Pet's TOENAILS

Stylin'
Photo by jinxmcc
Many dog owners loathe trimming their pet's toenails. Why? Because the puppy dislikes the entire operation and makes it nearly impossible. Nail clipping doesn't need to become a major battle of wills or a struggling match. The most essential part of trimming is getting your dog used to having a person play with his paws.


A good thing to do is get your puppy used to get his paws played with. As frequently as you can simply touch and manipulate his paws. Reward him with a snack and lots of encouragement when you try this. If you own an older dog who dislikes getting his nails clipped, go back to this step and get him familiar with having you feel his feet in a pleasurable way.

As soon as your pet is comfortable with having you touch his feet you can look at cutting.

To help make the task easier, have all your gear completely ready before you start. Get your trimmers or scissors available and be certain to own some kind of clotting agent. A styptic pencil is quite useful. Mishaps can happen, so it is important to be ready. If you do cut the dog don't panic, generally, the bleeding will stop without treatment in a short time.

Exactly how short can you cut? Dog's have no feeling in their toenails, clipping does not hurt. What may hurt the pet is if you cut the quick. If your pet has light coloured toenails it is much simpler to view the quick. This region is at the base of the toenail and extends out into the nail. This section of the nail can bleed if you cut your pet's nails too short and can easily hurt the pet. If your family dog possesses dark toenails and you can not view the quick just take the very end off. You're better off cutting more regularly then cutting the animal.

There are a lot of great clippers that you can buy at nearly every animal supply shop. The main thing is to make sure that they are sharp. What a lot of puppies are usually objecting to when they start squirming during cutting is not the trimming but the pressure that you are applying to their nail and paw. You can significantly minimize this if your trimmers are sharpened. Many people choose to utilize animal trimmers which have a special guard on them. This keeps the nail from sliding too deep into the clipper.



When does one clip? Many dogs will need to have their toenails clipped around every 2 to 3 weeks. This number will change depending upon what kind of surface your pet walks upon. Dog's that spend most of their time in the house will need to have their toenails clipped more often than a puppy that does lots of strolling on concrete or other rough surfaces.

If you are really not comfortable with clipping your pet's nails you could have it done professionally. You could possibly even request to watch the groomer and then determine exactly how they go about cutting the toenails. You might also get the aid of another person to help you handle your puppy particularly if you are new to trimming.


Sunday, May 17, 2020

COCKAPOO - Dog Breeds

Such a nose!
Photo by Kathleen Tyler Conklin 

The Cockapoo was developed by crossing the American Cocker Spaniel and the Miniature Poodle. This breed is originally from the United States where they were bred during the 1960s. The first dogs were from accidental mating, but lately, as their popularity has continued to grow, the matings have become deliberate. Like the Poodle, the Cockapoo is an intent spectator, not going to the hyper extremes of many American Cocker Spaniels.

Temperament
In general, the Cockapoo is affectionate with a laidback nature. Although they are alert, they also have a very sweet nature. The Cockapoo is a very energetic and sociable dog that is very eager to please its owner. This breed makes wonderful companion dogs, and will get along well with children and when under supervision. It is vital for the Cockapoo to be trained from puppyhood onwards; otherwise, they might struggle with anger later on in their lives. These dogs will get jealous if their owners pay attention to other animals and people. The Cockapoo is very trainable, and also a very intelligent dog. These dogs are the perfect companion pet as they are smart, trustworthy, and easy to care for.

Care
The Cockapoo is a fairly high maintenance dog and should be brushed and combed on a daily basis. The Cockapoo does not shed too much, and if they are brushed often, they will even shed less.  These dogs are therefore ideal for someone struggling with allergies. It is advised that the Cockapoo should be clipped at least once during the year.

Training
Cockapoos are very clever dogs, and this can make the training of these dogs very easy. These dogs will do very well when it comes to obedience, and if the training is presented in the correct manner these dogs will do extremely well. Cockapoos should be handled in a firm manner - training, however, should be very consistent but also very gentle.



Health problems
Some Cockapoos are fairly healthy, and others are not. They have a potential risk of some health problems, and these include hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, epilepsy, allergies, skin and ear problems, Legg-Calve-Perthes, luxating patellas, hypothyroidism, cryptorchidism and gastric torsion. Like any dog, the chance of avoiding health problems is increased if the dog's ancestors and relatives are screened for genetic disease themselves.