Showing posts with label Cat Fact Sheet. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cat Fact Sheet. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Fact Sheet: RAGDOLL CAT

This is a real seal point ragdoll cat.
This is a real seal point ragdoll cat. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The ragdoll cat is a large breed of cat, best known for its easygoing and mellow nature. They have long, thick fur coats and markings that resemble a Siamese. Caring for your ragdoll cat should involve a regular feeding and grooming schedule, along with regular visits to the veterinarian for checkups and vaccinations. If you take good care of your ragdoll cat, they will be healthy, happy, and a better active pet for you to enjoy.

Feeding 

Fresh food and water is an absolute necessity for your ragdoll. It is recommended that you always have a bowl full of dry food available for your cat, as well as a bowl of clean water. Wet food is probably not necessary on a daily basis, but it is really up to you, and what your ragdoll prefers. You may need to experiment with different brands and flavors of wet food. It can provide extra nutrients and add variety to your ragdoll's diet. We recommend feeding your ragdoll one of the premium brands of food, as the quality is usually better. Usually, kittens should have a special formula for food, so check with your veterinarian or local pet store if you're not sure.

You should try to clean the water bowl daily, and the food bowl as much as possible to prevent germs and bacteria from building up.

Grooming 

Ragdoll coats can vary in thickness and hair type. The average ragdoll hair is fairly thick and very soft to the touch. The length of the fur can be medium to long.

They usually do a good job of grooming themselves and don't require excessive brushing. It is a good idea to brush them strenuously a couple of times a week to prevent matting of the fur. The other reason for brushing on a regular schedule is if you happen to find a knot forming, you can easily brush it out before it gets out of control.

Ragdolls tend to enjoy grooming and make it easy for you to brush away!

Bathing 

Bathing is not really necessary if regular grooming is done. It may be beneficial to give your ragdoll a bath a couple of times a year, to clean the coat if really dirty or if they have gotten into something that can not be brushed out.

Make sure that you use a shampoo and conditioner that is formulated especially for cats, as regular human products may be harmful to your ragdoll.

Claws 

Declawing a cat is a controversial subject and one that brings many different opinions. We generally don't recommend declawing a ragdoll unless it will help with the safety within a household, specifically with children. Clipping the claws can be done on a regular basis to avoid damage to your furniture or other items in the house, so if that is your only reason for declawing the cat, your decision should be weighed carefully because it is not reversible.

Keep in mind that if a ragdoll cat is declawed, it should be limited in it's exposure to the outside world. Without front claws, a ragdoll doesn't have much of a defense against other animals or threats that it might encounter.



The litterbox should be kept in a fairly secluded area to allow for privacy, but not so out of the way that it is difficult to access for cleaning. Usually, a laundry room or other spare room serves as a good location.

We recommend scooping out the inside of the box at least once a day and actually replacing the litter weekly. If you have more than one cat, then it may be necessary to clean the box twice daily, morning and night for example.

There are many different brands and types of litter out there, it is just a matter of preference. The main thing is to find something that your cat will use, is easy to keep clean and affordable for your budget.

Veterinarian 

You should take your ragdoll to a veterinarian on a regular basis according to what they recommend. You will want to get vaccination shots and any other treatments that will keep your cat healthy and safe.

There may be special considerations if your ragdoll spends more time outside, such as pest control and a higher susceptibility to disease. Make sure you discuss this with your vet and work out a plan that makes sense.



Thursday, September 14, 2017

Fact Sheet: The SPHYNX CAT

Sphynx Cat

SPH Slavir Fidel
Sphynx Cat - Photo   by      Nickolas Titkov (cc)
Perhaps the world's most bizarre feline, the Sphynx cat has a unique hairless look that sets it apart from other cats. But that's not all. It's a rather rare and unusual breed of cat and has been described to feel like a warm suede hot water bottle. These cats need special care, but all the extra time and effort you dedicate to taking care of this cat will be well worth it. Their loving, playful and inquisitive nature makes them a wonderful cat to have around and call your own.

Breed History
Although it gets its name from the ancient Great Sphinx of Giza, Sphynx cats are a relatively new breed. There have been a number of occurrences of these hairless cats being born throughout history. But the Sphynx cat first came to be well-recognized in the year 1966 in Canada when a domestic cat in Toronto gave birth to a hairless kitten. This was considered to be the result of a natural genetic mutation. From there, cats with the mutation were bred to give rise to the Sphynx breed. In 1970 the line became extinct due to the belief that the mutation caused health issues and breathing difficulties in the cats. But this did not spell the end to this breed. Before long, in 1975, a cat in Minnesota, named Jezebel, gave birth to a hairless kitten. The kitten was sold to a local breeder who revived the Sphynx breed by expanding and strengthening the gene pool. After many years of careful breeding, now Sphynx cats are a varied and genetically sound breed, though still rare. In 2002, the Cat Fancier's Association accepted the cat breed for competition in the Championship Class.

Physical Characteristics
The most obvious feature of the Sphynx cat is its lack of hair. Although they are known as the "hairless" cats, they actually have warm peach fuzz fur on their bodies, especially on their nose, toes, and tail. They may or may not have whiskers and eyebrows. They have long, lean bodies and a rounded abdomen. They possess characteristically large triangular ears, large paw pads and their tail is long and slender. The skin of a Sphynx cat is wrinkled, and they come in a variety of colors and patterns, including Siamese point patterns. An adult Sphynx cat normally weighs around 8 to 15 pounds, and male cats can be up to 25% bigger than their female counterparts.

Personality & Temperament
Sphynx cats are an inquisitive breed that likes to be the center of attention and love being handled and cuddled. They are intelligent cats that are agile, playful and sweet-tempered. They have a sense of adventure and mischief that make them fun to be around. They love human companionship and will follow humans around the house. Sphynx cats are not for people who want a quiet, docile cat. They fit in well in homes with children, dogs or other cats. Oh, and these extroverts like to show off with their acrobatic tricks as well. So it's probably a good thing that these cheeky felines are kept indoors for the most part.

Common Medical Problems
Sphynx cats have few health or genetic problems and have a normal lifespan. They are generally considered to be a very robust breed. But they do still face some problems unique to their physical nature, most of which have to do with their hairlessness. During their 1st few weeks of life, Sphynx kittens are susceptible to respiratory infections. Sphynx cat breeders usually don't allow kittens to move to new homes until they are at least 12 weeks old so they're ready to handle a new environment. These hairless cats are also prone to sunburn and skin cancer, so it's important that their sun exposure is limited. They are also susceptible to the cold, so care needs to be taken to keep this indoor cat nice and warm.

Sphynx cats also have sensitive digestive systems, particularly in that they are small. They can develop severe diarrhea after using medication or being fed diets that contain less than 80% protein. They can also acquire common feline illnesses and are immunized just as other cat breeds are.
Hereditary myopathy (spasticity) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are two genetic conditions that are found in this breed, with the latter being more common. HCM refers to a thickening of the left ventricle of the heart, and may not cause outward symptoms. Sphynx breeders are trying to eliminate this condition from the breed by scanning yearly and removing positive cats from their breeding program.



Special Care & Maintenance
Because they lack the protection of a fur coat, a hairless Sphynx cat requires special care. It's recommended that you give them a weekly bath to remove the buildup of oil and dust on their skin. Their hair follicles give off oil, but unlike other cats, they have no hair to absorb the oil, and so their skin can easily become greasy. Because they have sensitive skin that burns easily, a very hot bath should be avoided. A sphynx cat's eyes and ears should also be cleaned weekly to remove any eye discharge or earwax. As they lack hair around their ears, it's easy for dirt to enter.

Sphynx cats are vulnerable to the sun and cold and are meant to be indoor cats. So exposure to the outdoors should be limited. They may be taken outside on occasion if they are heavily supervised and the weather is right for them. Generally, the temperature inside your house should be kept around 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Consider the Sphynx cat to be "naked" - if you would be cold naked, chances are that your cat is going to be too. You may need to clothe them during the winter.

Also, as their bodies are constantly working to keep themselves warm, their metabolism is higher than other cats so they need to be fed more food at meal times. Always place dry food out for your cat and add one or two servings of wet food each day. They need to be fed high-quality food with a good balance of fat and protein.

So if you think the intelligent and companionable Sphynx cat is for you, then you can purchase them from Sphynx cat breeders. Expect to pay more for a hairless Sphynx cat than you would for another cat breed. Sphynx cat adoption is also available, and costs less than buying a newborn kitten.

    By Velita Livingston
    Velita Livingston is the founder of the Cat Lover's Diary blog which provides rich content with great advice on cat care tips and cat training, teaching pet owners how to protect, pamper and live peacefully with their pets. Visit the http://www.catloversdiary.com to watch the Cat Lover's Diary Movie, it contains breathtaking images and heartwarming quotes... It will uplift and inspire you! You can also visit the Cat Lover's Diary on Facebook and Twitter.
    Article Source: EzineArticles



Sunday, October 30, 2016

Fact Sheet: MAINE COON CAT

(Original Title: Maine Coon Cat Breed Facts)

English: A Maine Coon cat.
A Maine Coon cat. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Maine Coon cats, the official state cat in Maine, are one of the oldest breeds in North America. As one of the largest breeds, these cats can weigh between 15 to 20+ pounds. Its distinctive characteristics include a long, thick tail; muscular body; broad chest; and tufted ears. Because of their friendly temperament, they are nicknamed "Gentle Giants" by their owners.


Maine Coon History
Their origins are unknown though several popular stories have been passed along the years. One story involves Capt. Charles Coon, an English captain who frequently traveled to New England with long-haired cats aboard his ship. Upon docking, the cats mated with local feral cats and produced lots of offspring. Townspeople referred to the strays as "Coon's cats".

Another folktale involves Queen of France, Marie Antoinette, who attempted an escape with Capt. Samuel Clough in 1793. Her prized possessions, including six beloved cats, were stashed on Clough's ship. Though she didn't escape her beheading, her cats arrived safely in Massachusetts. The cats were described with similar characteristics to the cooncat. Breeders consider the cats' ancestry to go back to the 11th century with the Vikings. History shows the breed existed in the 1800s as hunting and domestic cats.

In 1967, the breed was officially recognized as a unique breed of domestic cat.




Maine Coon Weight and Size
Maine Coon cats can weigh between 9 to 18 pounds. Males typically weight between 13 to 18 pounds, while females average 9 to 12 pounds. Their large, body shape, rectangle-build, and long hair make them look even larger. They are not full-grown until they reach 3 to 5 years of age. Adults can reach 10 to 16 inches in height.

Their length can be up to 40 inches, including their tails which can be 14 inches long.

Maine Coon Personality
They have several distinctive features, including their long, bushy tail; tufted ears; large, expressive eyes; and ruff around their neck (like a lions). Their eyes are green, gold, green-gold, or copper colors. Their coat is soft and comes in every color and pattern, except pointed patterns, like the Siamese. Their thick fur is shorter on their front legs and shoulders and longer on their back, perches, stomach, and tail. Their tail is often as long as their body.



They have a squared muzzle. They are nicknamed "Gentle Giants" for their affectionate, loving behavior. They are not lap cats, though they enjoy following family members to offer help with any projects. Their playful nature continues in adulthood. Their distinctive meow -- a chirp sound -- lets owners know when they want their attention, to play, or to mate. They are great pets for families. Generally they are indoor cats, and they enjoy interacting with people.

    Sarah is a committed breed owner and enthusiast. She has created 'MaineCoonCompanion.net', a website dedicated to Maine Coon lovers and their pets. 
    Article Source: EzineArticles