Showing posts with label Carlin. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Carlin. Show all posts

Thursday, March 15, 2018

The PUG - Little Dog in Charge

Closeup of a pug's face. {| align="center...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Small and spunky, the pug dates back over 2000 years. Their story is rich in history and they have been favorite subjects for many painters. They weigh between 14-18 pounds and are 10 inches to 14 inches in height. They are known as Mops in Germany and Carlin in France.

The Pug comes in many colors including black, apricot-fawn or silver. They are AKC recognized. Their short, smooth, glossy, fine coat is very easy to groom. They only need an occasional brushing and only need to be bathed with necessary. Be sure to clean the creases in their face regularly. Pugs have been known to love attention and they typically enjoy the attention that a good brushing gives them. Their curly tail, flat muzzle, and prominent eyes are three of their best-known appearance traits.

Born to be a companion dog, the Pug loves attention and being with their family. They need a family that will not leave them alone for long periods of time on a regular basis and does best in homes where someone is around most of the time. They are a lap dog and enjoy relaxing with their family, but they also have an energetic side and need plenty of play time. Be sure that you don't overexert them. They are happy-go-lucky little dogs. They do well with other pets and dogs, but early socialization is recommended. They have an *I'm in charge* attitude with their family and other pets. Due to this reason and their small size, they work best with older, well-behaved children. They will let you know if they hear an unfamiliar sound or if someone is at the door making them excellent watchdogs.

Dating back to 700 BC, the Pug originated in China. There is a debate among many groups as to which dogs were used to develop the pug. Pugs were mainly used as companion dogs for royalty and nobility. They were introduced to Europe through trade ships traveling between China and Europe. It is said that a Pug saved the life of William, Prince of Orange by alerting him that the Spaniards were approaching. Napoleon's wife used a Pug to send a secret message to him when she was in prison. Winston Churchill's wife called him by the nickname Pug. Many of you might be familiar with the famous pug Frank that appeared in the movies Men in Black and Men in Black II.



With their lovable, happy nature and need for affection and companionship, the Pug makes an excellent dog for families looking for a lap dog with a take charge attitude. They enjoy traveling or staying at home as they are happy whenever and wherever they are with their family. Their whimsical looks and nature make them hard to resist.



Wednesday, November 23, 2016

PUG DOG Breed Profile

Description: The Pug is a small dog, considered by some to be a dwarf Mastiff. It is a solid, compact animal with the dogs measuring 12 to 14 inches and weighing up to 20 pounds. The bitches are generally two inches shorter and have a weight of 13 to 18 pounds. The Pug is well known for its short, wrinkled face and curled tail that rests on its back. The baby Pugs are sometimes called Puglets. The Pug's coat color can be black, fawn (often with a darker facial mask), silver, or apricot. Other names for the Pug include Mops, Chinese Pug Dog, or Carlin. The Pug can live for up to 15 years.
A Pug dog.
A Pug dog. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
History: Two schools of thought contend over the origin of the Pug. It is the most generally accepted that the Pug came into being in Asia and is a descendant of the Pekingese. It was mentioned in the writings of Confucius and was a favorite among the Chinese royalty and nobility. The Pug was also kept in Tibetan monasteries. It was the Dutch East India Company that brought the Pug to Europe in the 16th century. The Pug was almost instantly popular and is featured in a self portrait of the artist Hogarth.

Temperament: The Pug is an affectionate, outgoing dog that loves to be around people. It is something of a clown and often amuses its family with its playful antics. The Pug is very good with children and enjoys playing with them. The Pug is a confident and alert dog that will keep and eye on the house, without excessive yappiness. It gets along fine with other dogs and family pets.

Health Issues: Due to its short muzzle, the Pug is susceptible to the usual problems that affect brachycephalic breeds. The Pug will snore and wheeze and can suffer from "snort attacks", which are alarming but not dangerous. The Pug can suffer from hip dysplasia, and this occurs in a majority of these dogs. Be careful that your Pug does not become overweight as this can make breathing and joint problems worse. A very serious ailment is Pug Dog Encephalitis, which causes brain inflammation in young dogs. A caesarean section is often necessary to deliver the pups.

Grooming: The lighter colored Pugs, fawn and apricot, can be fairly heavy shedders, especially seasonally, and should be brushed regularly. The black Pug sheds much less and does not need to be tended to as much. The wrinkly face of the Pug needs to be kept clean and dry as infections can develop in the moist wrinkle creases.



Living Conditions: The Pug is perfect for indoor living, being equally comfortable in a house or apartment. It should have a daily walk to keep it healthy, but these should be skipped in hot weather. Because of the short face of the Pug, it must be protected from both heat and cold. It can suffer heat stroke very easily and should be kept cool during the summer. The Pug will want to be with its human family as much as possible.