Showing posts with label Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Show all posts

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Fact Sheet: DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER

(Original Title: Dandie Dinmont Terrier - Facts You Must Know Before Adopting
Dandie Dinmont Terrier)

Dandie Dinmont Terrier - GCH King's Mtn. Angelina Ballerina 02
Photo by Petful.com
Breed Description

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small breed with a distinctive top-knot hair on the head of this terrier dog. Primarily bred to go to the ground, this breed is a low-stationed working dog with an arched top line. They are between 8-11 inches tall at the shoulders and weighs from 18-24 pounds at the average.

Coat

The Dandie Dinmont has a coat mixed with rough top coat and silky undercoat, as demonstrated over their heads. The distinctive hairs on their heads are usually kept relatively long and may shroud the eyes if left without trimming for too long. Their coat color comes in silver and black coat, or reddish-yellow color that is commonly called "mustard".

Activity

These dogs need to be walked on a daily basis and will enjoy playing in the park, or any other securely fenced open areas.

Temperament

The breed is fun-loving and affectionate, making them an excellent companion dog. They are determined, lively, and willful, with intelligent and independent nature, bold, yet dignified. They are aloof with strangers, often protective of family and property. They are great with well-behaved kids, and babies, as long as they were reared with them. Dominance varies greatly, as some males may be aggressive with male dogs in their home, while females can be bad-tempered and snappy.

Overview

Also known as the Dandie or the Hindlee Terrier, this is a breed of dog that belongs to the Terrier group. This interesting little breed has a body similar to that of a Dachshund, but they have a wavy and long coat, with puffed white hair on top of their heads.

Care

These dogs require regular brushing. They need professional grooming, as dead hair should be plucked at about once or twice in a year.

Training

These dogs are tricky to train. They require firm, consistent, and fun training sessions to make these puppies interested. They are intelligent but intelligent enough to question the judgment of their trainers. It is therefore imperative to use positive reinforcement as your approach to asserting your stand as the leader of the pack.

Housebreaking is an important part of training for new owners of these puppies. The key is to be around all the time while they are small, and never allowing them access to the areas where they can muddle up around the house.



Crate training is known to be effective for your dog's training as this allows them the opportunity for quiet time in a space where he can make it his territory, as well as a chance for early housetraining owners can work on.

Character

These dogs are generally lively, independent, and affectionate. They are friendly but can be stubborn at times. They are bold, unafraid, but remains dignified, even when playing. They are extremely loyal and can make excellent guard dogs. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is intelligent, playful, and fun especially when given enough attention.




Tuesday, May 31, 2016

DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER - Dogs of the World

Dandie Dinmont Terrier - Dogs of the World



Monday, May 30, 2016

DANDIE DINMONT TERRIERS: Ten Things You May Not Know About Them

Although controversy has always surrounded the biological origins of the dog now known as the Dandie Dinmont, no one has ever queried the background to his strange name.  It was from noble beginnings, in Sir Walter Scott’s 'Guy Mannering', that the name Dandie Dinmont first came to life.  Here are ten more things you may not know about the Dandie Dinmont …..

English: The female - Dandie Dinmont Terrier d...
The female - Dandie Dinmont Terrier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
*  James Davidson, a farmer from the Rule Water in the Scottish Borders, is believed to have inspired the character ‘Dandie Dinmont’ in Sir. Walter Scott’s book.

*  In the early 1900s the little terriers that eventually became known as Dandie Dinmonts were more commonly called Pepper or Mustard Terriers or by the name of the farm where they were bred, e.g. Hindlee Terrier.  Hindlee was the home of  James Davidson who himself kept six Dandies, called: ‘Auld Pepper’, ‘Auld Mustard’, ‘Young Pepper’, ‘Young Mustard’, ‘Little Pepper’ and ‘Little Mustard’.  Davidson was adamant that all Dandies descended from two of his own dogs named Tarr and Pepper.

*  Sir Walter Scott also kept Dandie Dinmonts at Abbotsford alongside other popular breeds of the day.

*  The Dandie may have been closely related to the Bedlington Terrier, both having the same pendulous ear, and a light top-knot.  But the Dandie evolved into a long-bodied, short-legged dog and the Bedlington grew into a long-legged dog with short body.  To illustrate the close relationship of the two breeds records show that Lord Antrim, in the early days of dog shows, exhibited two animals from the same litter, and with one obtained a prize or honourable mention in the Dandie classes, and with the other a like distinction in the Bedlington classes.

*  At one time the Dandie was included in the general family of Scotch (Scottish) Terriers and was recognised as a separate breed in 1873.  The Kennel Club of the UK was also formed in 1873 and just two years later, on 17th November 1875, a meeting was held at The Fleece Hotel, Selkirk, at which was formed The Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club.  

*  The breed standard of early Dandie enthusiasts was laid down by William Wardlaw Reed and other enthusiasts of the day.  The meeting that established the standards which are very much similar to those used today was held at the Red Lion Hotel in Carlisle, England, in 1876.  Apart from one minor amendment in 1921, when the weight range was changed from 14  - 24 lbs to 18 - 24 lbs, the Dandie standard in Great Britain remained unchanged for more than one hundred years. 

*   In the 1980s the Kennel Club of England asked breed Clubs to change the old judging standard to a new set and the original wording of the standard set in 1876 was amended.  Now all countries use the standard as revised in 1987 except Canada which adhered to the original standard.  


*  The breed has been popular with gypsies and the aristocracy, thereby revealing this as a dog that really can mix in all social circles and, in the late 19th Century, devoted breeders Bradshaw-Smith  of Blackwoodhouse and Gerald Leatham of Weatherby, presented a Dandie Dinmont to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

*  In his book 'D is for Dog' (various publishers), veterinary surgeon Frank Manolson described the Dandie as one "who looks and acts like a grizzled backwoodsman shopping in Tiffany’s.  If you want a real individualist, you simply must consider the Dandie Dinmont."

*  The Dandie looks wise and thoughtful and according to an old Scottish saying: ‘A Dandie looks at you as though he’s forgotten more than you will ever know