Friday, July 28, 2017

Fact Sheet: Bedlington Terrier


Original Title: Bedlington Terrier

Français : Boutchie, un Bedlington Terrier en ...
Français : Boutchie, un Bedlington Terrier en janvier 2003. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Breed group: Terrier

Weight: 17-23 lbs
Height: male 16.5 inches, female: 15.5 inches

Overview
This breed has its origin in England where they have been developed during the 18th century. Bedlington Terriers was originally known as Rothbury Terriers and they were named after the Rothbury district on the English border. These dogs were highly valued as hunters of a variety of game including foxes, hares and badgers. A Rothbury dog was mated with a Bedlington bitch in about 1825, which resulted in the Bedlington terrier. Bedlington terriers were used as vermin hunters by miners of Bedlington. They also used these dogs as fighting dogs in the pits.

Temperament
The Bedlington terrier of today is a more affectionate and friendly dog, and this is due to more careful breeding. Bedlington terriers are very cheerful and playful dogs, and they also love children. These dogs are devoted and energetic dogs, but they do have a stubborn streak. This breed has to be socialised with other animals from an early age onwards to prevent problems later on. The Bedlington terrier has lots of power, and they are full of courage and energy. They can run very fast, and they are keen diggers. These dogs love to bark, and they can be a bit tense. This breed should be fenced in, otherwise they will take off as they love to chase.

Care
The Bedlington terrier is a high maintenance breed and they will require a professional clipping once in every six weeks. These dogs needs to be brushed and combed every day. They should however only be bathed when it is necessary, as their coats will become lank if bathed too often. The coats of these dogs shed almost no hair, and this makes them suitable for allergy sufferers. The pluck inside their ears should also be cleaned. This breed is also considered fine for allergy sufferers.

Training
The Bedlington terrier is an independent and playful dog that is fairly difficult to train. They will benefit if they are socialised from an early age onwards, especially with cats. This breed should also receive thorough obedience training as they have a tendency to bark excessively and be destructive. The Bedlington terrier will also not do well if the training is harsh or heavy-handed. The Bedlington terrier loves human companionship, and should be trained in a firm, loving and consistent manner. They do extremely well in agility, obedience and fly ball.



Health problems
Some Bedlington terriers may have a serious inborn liver problem known as Copper Storage Disease. This breed is also prone to a genetic kidney disease, PRA, thyroid problems and eye trouble such as cataracts and retinal disease.



Thursday, July 27, 2017

List of Hairless HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS

While there are many breeds of hypoallergenic dogs, if you are looking for a dog that is unique, then you may want to research hairless breeds. While many people believe these breeds are made up of small dogs, this is not always the case. Medium sized dogs can also be found. Four types of hairless breeds include: the Mexican Hairless, the American Hairless Terrier, the Chinese Crested, and the Peruvian Hairless. If you are considering buying one of these breeds, you may have to search for a breeder online as these dogs are not as common as other breeds of hypoallergenic dogs.

Mexican Hairless
Mexican Hairless - Photo by Sew Ripped 
The Mexican Hairless may be the most difficult hairless breed because there are very few breeders in the United States and in other countries. This breed has a short coat that will not need to be groomed or brushed because it is so short. This means that you will not have to worry about matting, or other issues concerning the care of the coat. The Mexican Hairless is available in different sizes, contrary to popular belief. 

Ruby the Bald
American Hairless Terrier - Photo by johnynek 
The American Hairless Terrier is another breed that is not truly hairless. This breed also has a short coat that does not have to be groomed. Originally, an accident of nature discovered in 1972, breeders successfully reproduced other puppies in 1981 and have been selling them ever since. True to its Terrier roots, the American Hairless Terrier is a small, husky dog that is very friendly and outgoing. These dogs are great for those who are allergic to dogs and who live in small apartments or homes.


MyDOG 2015 Chinese crested dog
Chinese Crested - Photo by Svenska Mässan 
The Chinese Crested is an unusual dog because it is available in two distinct varieties. The first variety is truly hairless except for long hair that grows on its paws, head, and tail. Grooming can be done by a professional or at home if you know what you are doing. The second variety called the powder puff and has long, fine hair that resembles human hair. Both varieties are considered to be hypoallergenic because these dogs do not shed too often. 

hairless peruvian dog with a moheican
Peruvian Hairless - Photo by olliethebastard 
The Peruvian Hairless is truly hairless. This breed is medium in size and is intelligent and friendly to most people. This dog is not for those who have had no prior experience working with dogs. They need to be trained to follow commands and even though they are intelligent and learn quickly, they will not always obey. 

Hypoallergenic hairless dogs need exercise, crave attention, and enjoy being with their owners as much as other breeds. You will have to be careful when taking them outdoors because they get sunburnt easily and will require lotion when this happens. Since certain breeds can experience dry skin or acne, you may have to apply skin creams in order to reduce pain or itchiness. 

In order to find a breeder, you may have to search online because there are few breeders that breed hairless dogs simply because they are as popular as other breeds. If you can’t decide if a hairless dog is for you, visit those who have a hairless or visit the breeder to learn more. 



Wednesday, July 26, 2017

SERVAL CAT

Recently, two Serval cats were delivered to the Caldwell Zoo in Tyler, Texas. The nine month old cats are named Bosco and Amos. The kittens came from the Tautphaus Park Zoo in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Serval cat is considered one of the best hunters in the wild with the ability to catch it prey over 50% of the time.

The Beautiful Serval
Serval - Photo by Steve Wilson – over 5 million views Thanks !! 
A Serval cat is a medium sized African wild animal. It is a strong, slender cat with long legs and relatively short tale. It has a small head and oval ears. The fur of the animal is striped on the head and back of the neck and the body is spotted. The coloring is tawny with black stripes and spots. The Serval has traits similar to the cheetah. From a distance, a Serval will resemble a cheetah but up close the Serval is a smaller animal. A Serval cat will weigh from 20 to 50 pounds. It has a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. Besides it's normal sounds, it can purr like a domestic cat.

The Serval cat lives in savannas and likes to feed on rodents. It will feed on other prey like fish, frogs and insects if it finds them. A Serval is very fast and has excellent jumping ability making it a good hunter. The cat tends to eat quickly causing it to regurgitate it's food. If the prey is small enough , it will swallow it whole. It is also a very intelligent animal enabling to outwit it's prey. Although the Serval does very little, it is a great swimmer. Larger cats like the leopard prey on the Serval.

The cat is normally bred in the wild but can also be bred in captivity. In the wild, the young are raised in sheltered locations for protection from bigger cats. The litter can contain up to five kittens. A kitten can mature to an adult in as little as 190 days.

A Serval cat can be domesticated. The animal is friendly, good-natured and easily tamed. But like any wild animal, the cat may become destructive and dangerous before fully grown. A Serval is very loyal to it's owner and is difficult to transfer to a different owner. The cat popularity's as a pet has increased in the United States. In the United States, a special license is required to have a Serval as a pet. A Serval has been bred with a domestic cat called the Savannah. Most states consider the Savannah as a domestic cat and do not put special conditions on the breed.


The Serval population has been shrinking due to humans encroaching on it's habitat and hunting the animal for it's fur. Since the Serval is a relatively small cat, it takes numerous pelts to make a garment. In many countries, the Serval has become a protected species. The CITES organization has put the Serval on it's watch list.

This article does not endorse or recommend a Serval cat as a pet.


    By Frank Loethen
    Frank Loethen. married, owner of an Internet business for cat products and grandfather of 4.
    Article Source: EzineArticles


Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Cat Food For Urinary Tract Health of Cats

Cats are susceptible to urinary tract health problems. In fact, 30% of cats in the entire world could suffer from urinary health problems at some time in their life. One way to keep your cat away from urinary problems is to give it urinary tract health cat food. In our modern society today, there are cat foods which are specifically designed to boost the urinary tract health of cats.

cacatfood8
Cat Food - Photo by pathwithpaws 
Cats are not fond of drinking water. This is because they descended from a family of desert creatures. Their liquid intake depends on the food they eat. When cats do not get enough water daily, they become susceptible to urinary problems such as urinary tract infection. Likewise, they could suffer from dehydration. It is imperative, therefore, that cat owners give their cats urinary tract health cat food that are specifically designed to address the specific daily nutritional requirements of cats.

Cat food for urinary tract health helps prevent the onset of urinary tract infections in cats. If the cat already has the infection, cat food for urinary tract health could help accelerate the cat's faster recovery from the infection.

Urinary tract health cat food may come in different forms. Commercially sold urinary tract health cat food may be sold in dry form or in wet form. This may also be frozen or premixed. No matter what form it comes, however, cat food for urinary tract health is supplemented with the right vitamins and minerals and other necessary nutrients, such as the amino acid derivative taurine, arginine, niacin, arachidonic acid, vitamin A, and vitamin B12.

Most often than not, when a cat has suffered from urinary tract infection, the veterinarian would give prescription food designed to alleviate or prevent the recurrence of the disease. Nonetheless, the cat owner could still opt to give his cat other forms of diet that contain the necessary nutrients needed for the faster recuperation of the cat.

Wet Food vs. Dry Food

Dry cat food is cheaper compared to wet cat food. It is also more convenient as it could be left out in the cat's bowl for several days without the danger of spoiling. Moreover, it is thought to help scrape off the dental calculus of cats. However, dry cat food is found to be associated with the problem of obesity in cats. Likewise, it could lead to some urinary problems in cats as it contains less moisture and does not add to the daily requirement of liquid intake in cats.

Wet cat food, either canned or home-made may contain 75-78% water and therefore, provides the cat the necessary liquid intake required for it to effectively flush out unwanted organisms and bacteria in its system. It helps keep cats away from being dehydrated as well. Giving your cat wet food is one way to prevent urinary tract problems in your cat.

Since cats rely on their food intake to get enough water, most veterinarians and cat experts would recommend cat urinary tract health diets that contain a lot of moisture. Thus, most prescriptions may consist mostly of wet food and other forms of diet which could supplement the liquid intake of your cat.



Monday, July 24, 2017

Health Problems in the GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

As with most pedigree breeds, there are certain hereditary conditions that can be a problem in the German Shepherd as well as other health issues that are more prevalent in this breed which need to be considered if you are thinking acquiring a GSD.

English: 9-week-old German Shepherd puppy.
9-week-old German Shepherd puppy. 

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you are buying a German Shepherd puppy it is important to ensure that you only purchase a healthy dog from a reputable breeder and a good idea would be to contact the breed council who should be able to provide you with a list of such breeders. Most reputable breeders don’t need to advertise but if they do they tend not to use free papers or other general advertising media but will usually place their advert in a specialist dog magazine or paper. The Kennel Club will provide a list of breeders but this does not signify that they are reputable only that they register their puppies with the KC.
There are a number of common conditions seen in this breed, some of which have a better prognosis than others but all of which are expensive to treat – so insure your German Shepherd Dog as soon as you get it.

Inherited conditions such as hip dysplasia are becoming more common largely because of irresponsible breeding so you should look for a puppy whose parents are both hip scored and the lower the score the better – ideally less than ten. This is a distressing and painful condition for a GSD as well as the costs for treating being prohibitive if the animal is not insured. Elbow dysplasia is also a common hereditary condition.

Bloat or gastric torsion is a real emergency and a life threatening condition, which has become more common in deep chested dogs over the years. Experts are divided but good tips for reducing the risk are that it is best to feed 2 small meals rather than one large meal a day and to avoid feeding your GSD before strenuous exercise.

Anal furunculosis is a distressing auto immune condition which can be controlled with expensive drugs for a while but will inevitably progress as is the condition CDRM which is a degenerative disease which will ultimately lead to the loss of use of the dogs back legs and then bowel/urinary incontinence.



For whatever reason there seems to be an increasing number of GSD’s suffering from PI – pancreatic insufficiency, which presents as chronic watery diarrhoea and failure to thrive. This condition is treatable with expensive pancreatic enzymes and a low fat diet but the regime must be strictly adhered to.

Epilepsy is also more common these days and although it can be controlled by drugs, usually tolerance eventually occurs which will often result in the loss of control of the fits and the likelihood of brain damage as a result of prolonged uncontrolled fitting.

To protect your new puppy and in order to try to minimise long term or future health problems, it is vital that a high quality feeding regime is adopted from the start. German shepherds often have digestive problems so it is important to find a quality food that your dog likes and one that doesn’t upset the digestion. If in doubt ask your vet for advice or contact German Shepherd Rescue UK.