Wednesday, July 26, 2017

SERVAL CAT

Recently, two Serval cats were delivered to the Caldwell Zoo in Tyler, Texas. The nine month old cats are named Bosco and Amos. The kittens came from the Tautphaus Park Zoo in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Serval cat is considered one of the best hunters in the wild with the ability to catch it prey over 50% of the time.

The Beautiful Serval
Serval - Photo by Steve Wilson – over 5 million views Thanks !! 
A Serval cat is a medium sized African wild animal. It is a strong, slender cat with long legs and relatively short tale. It has a small head and oval ears. The fur of the animal is striped on the head and back of the neck and the body is spotted. The coloring is tawny with black stripes and spots. The Serval has traits similar to the cheetah. From a distance, a Serval will resemble a cheetah but up close the Serval is a smaller animal. A Serval cat will weigh from 20 to 50 pounds. It has a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. Besides it's normal sounds, it can purr like a domestic cat.

The Serval cat lives in savannas and likes to feed on rodents. It will feed on other prey like fish, frogs and insects if it finds them. A Serval is very fast and has excellent jumping ability making it a good hunter. The cat tends to eat quickly causing it to regurgitate it's food. If the prey is small enough , it will swallow it whole. It is also a very intelligent animal enabling to outwit it's prey. Although the Serval does very little, it is a great swimmer. Larger cats like the leopard prey on the Serval.

The cat is normally bred in the wild but can also be bred in captivity. In the wild, the young are raised in sheltered locations for protection from bigger cats. The litter can contain up to five kittens. A kitten can mature to an adult in as little as 190 days.

A Serval cat can be domesticated. The animal is friendly, good-natured and easily tamed. But like any wild animal, the cat may become destructive and dangerous before fully grown. A Serval is very loyal to it's owner and is difficult to transfer to a different owner. The cat popularity's as a pet has increased in the United States. In the United States, a special license is required to have a Serval as a pet. A Serval has been bred with a domestic cat called the Savannah. Most states consider the Savannah as a domestic cat and do not put special conditions on the breed.


The Serval population has been shrinking due to humans encroaching on it's habitat and hunting the animal for it's fur. Since the Serval is a relatively small cat, it takes numerous pelts to make a garment. In many countries, the Serval has become a protected species. The CITES organization has put the Serval on it's watch list.

This article does not endorse or recommend a Serval cat as a pet.


    By Frank Loethen
    Frank Loethen. married, owner of an Internet business for cat products and grandfather of 4.
    Article Source: EzineArticles


Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Cat Food For Urinary Tract Health of Cats

Cats are susceptible to urinary tract health problems. In fact, 30% of cats in the entire world could suffer from urinary health problems at some time in their life. One way to keep your cat away from urinary problems is to give it urinary tract health cat food. In our modern society today, there are cat foods which are specifically designed to boost the urinary tract health of cats.

cacatfood8
Cat Food - Photo by pathwithpaws 
Cats are not fond of drinking water. This is because they descended from a family of desert creatures. Their liquid intake depends on the food they eat. When cats do not get enough water daily, they become susceptible to urinary problems such as urinary tract infection. Likewise, they could suffer from dehydration. It is imperative, therefore, that cat owners give their cats urinary tract health cat food that are specifically designed to address the specific daily nutritional requirements of cats.

Cat food for urinary tract health helps prevent the onset of urinary tract infections in cats. If the cat already has the infection, cat food for urinary tract health could help accelerate the cat's faster recovery from the infection.

Urinary tract health cat food may come in different forms. Commercially sold urinary tract health cat food may be sold in dry form or in wet form. This may also be frozen or premixed. No matter what form it comes, however, cat food for urinary tract health is supplemented with the right vitamins and minerals and other necessary nutrients, such as the amino acid derivative taurine, arginine, niacin, arachidonic acid, vitamin A, and vitamin B12.

Most often than not, when a cat has suffered from urinary tract infection, the veterinarian would give prescription food designed to alleviate or prevent the recurrence of the disease. Nonetheless, the cat owner could still opt to give his cat other forms of diet that contain the necessary nutrients needed for the faster recuperation of the cat.

Wet Food vs. Dry Food

Dry cat food is cheaper compared to wet cat food. It is also more convenient as it could be left out in the cat's bowl for several days without the danger of spoiling. Moreover, it is thought to help scrape off the dental calculus of cats. However, dry cat food is found to be associated with the problem of obesity in cats. Likewise, it could lead to some urinary problems in cats as it contains less moisture and does not add to the daily requirement of liquid intake in cats.

Wet cat food, either canned or home-made may contain 75-78% water and therefore, provides the cat the necessary liquid intake required for it to effectively flush out unwanted organisms and bacteria in its system. It helps keep cats away from being dehydrated as well. Giving your cat wet food is one way to prevent urinary tract problems in your cat.

Since cats rely on their food intake to get enough water, most veterinarians and cat experts would recommend cat urinary tract health diets that contain a lot of moisture. Thus, most prescriptions may consist mostly of wet food and other forms of diet which could supplement the liquid intake of your cat.



Monday, July 24, 2017

Health Problems in the GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

As with most pedigree breeds, there are certain hereditary conditions that can be a problem in the German Shepherd as well as other health issues that are more prevalent in this breed which need to be considered if you are thinking acquiring a GSD.

English: 9-week-old German Shepherd puppy.
9-week-old German Shepherd puppy. 

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you are buying a German Shepherd puppy it is important to ensure that you only purchase a healthy dog from a reputable breeder and a good idea would be to contact the breed council who should be able to provide you with a list of such breeders. Most reputable breeders don’t need to advertise but if they do they tend not to use free papers or other general advertising media but will usually place their advert in a specialist dog magazine or paper. The Kennel Club will provide a list of breeders but this does not signify that they are reputable only that they register their puppies with the KC.
There are a number of common conditions seen in this breed, some of which have a better prognosis than others but all of which are expensive to treat – so insure your German Shepherd Dog as soon as you get it.

Inherited conditions such as hip dysplasia are becoming more common largely because of irresponsible breeding so you should look for a puppy whose parents are both hip scored and the lower the score the better – ideally less than ten. This is a distressing and painful condition for a GSD as well as the costs for treating being prohibitive if the animal is not insured. Elbow dysplasia is also a common hereditary condition.

Bloat or gastric torsion is a real emergency and a life threatening condition, which has become more common in deep chested dogs over the years. Experts are divided but good tips for reducing the risk are that it is best to feed 2 small meals rather than one large meal a day and to avoid feeding your GSD before strenuous exercise.

Anal furunculosis is a distressing auto immune condition which can be controlled with expensive drugs for a while but will inevitably progress as is the condition CDRM which is a degenerative disease which will ultimately lead to the loss of use of the dogs back legs and then bowel/urinary incontinence.



For whatever reason there seems to be an increasing number of GSD’s suffering from PI – pancreatic insufficiency, which presents as chronic watery diarrhoea and failure to thrive. This condition is treatable with expensive pancreatic enzymes and a low fat diet but the regime must be strictly adhered to.

Epilepsy is also more common these days and although it can be controlled by drugs, usually tolerance eventually occurs which will often result in the loss of control of the fits and the likelihood of brain damage as a result of prolonged uncontrolled fitting.

To protect your new puppy and in order to try to minimise long term or future health problems, it is vital that a high quality feeding regime is adopted from the start. German shepherds often have digestive problems so it is important to find a quality food that your dog likes and one that doesn’t upset the digestion. If in doubt ask your vet for advice or contact German Shepherd Rescue UK.




Sunday, July 23, 2017

FINNISH SPITZ - Dogs of the World

Finnish Spitz - Dogs of the world - Photo: Wikimedia



Saturday, July 22, 2017

CAT Fights

Feral or unferal, your kitty may get tangled up in one of these if they are in particular an outdoor cat. Indoor cats if by themselves are obviously not as prone to this risk, unless they find themselves outside, or a stray visitor inside.. but two or more indoor cats can have their "bad" days as well. 

English: a silhouette of cats on a roof fighting
A silhouette of cats on a roof fighting
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

If you allow your cat to roam outside in the big wild outdoors, I seriously recommend you take kitty to your veternarian from a young age and start getting him vaccinated! And make sure this is done every year no questions! This is necessary if you don't want your kitty to get infected by nasties like Feline Aids (FIV) which is transmitted through blood while fighting. This also protects your kitty among a lot of other different diseases out there like Feline Leukemia (FLV).

It is also highly advisable to get him (or her) neutered. Unspayed males will fight feirsly for a female if she is in heat, which can leave both cats in tatters and spayed males can find themselves in the middle of something they don't understand if an unspayed males get the wrong idea...

Cats fighting outside at night time can be quite of a shock, as sometimes they can sound close to a child shreking or yelling, and it is definately the last thing you want to hear when your trying to sleep at night! My ultimate way of getting rid of cats engaged in a fight is to turn the hose on them, as noises won't startle them hardly as they are concentrating too much on the other cat! 

For indoor cats, obviously water all over the carpet is unwanted so I find usually placing a large object between the two which will cut of eye contact with both cats, if they are engaged in a fight, don't get in their way as cat bites can not only hurt, but are more likely to become infected than dog bites. Use a chair and turn upside down and use the back of the chair and gently slide the chair between the cats, this will startle them and stop them from fighting. Give the cats 'time out' by placing one in a closed room for a short period of time.

A good tell-tale sign if a cat is frightened, the hair will stand up all over the body and when the cat threatens or is ready to attack, you will see the hair stand up in a narrow band along the spine and tail to make him look bigger, and this is also a good time to get out that hose or chair! 





With the average lifespan of an outdoor only cat if they are feral or unferal, is only about three years! Which is why if you love your kitty and want him to have a healthy live, keep him indoors and he can live a whopping 16 years longer!

Not only will you benefit from keeping your kitty living longer indoors, it will save you expensive veternarian bills for infected scratches, broken teeth, torn ears, and so on by these nasty one-on-ones.